How to spot PMDD, the severe form of PMS that isn’t “normal”

How to spot PMDD, the severe form of PMS that isn’t “normal” (getthegloss.com)

[Get the Gloss, 4/17/19]  90% OF PMDD CASES GO UNDIAGNOSED YET IT AFFECTS 1 IN 20 WOMEN AND CAUSES SYMPTOMS RANGING FROM PAINFUL CRAMPS TO DIZZINESS AND EVEN SUICIDAL THOUGHTS. HERE’S HOW TO RECOGNISE IT AND TWO SUFFERERS’ EXPERIENCES OF PMDD

We’ve all heard of PMS

mainly because the majority of women have suffered from it in some way, shape or form and also because it’s still to this day presented to us by some sectors of society as evidence of our “weakness” or as the focus of snidey sexist comments. PMS may form part of mainstream consciousness, even if it’s derided, but far less is known about the rarer and more extreme PMDD (premenstrual dysphoric disorder), an endocrine disorder and recently listed mental health problem that affects one in 20 women and can have extreme emotional and physical side-effects. April marks PMDD awareness month, but given that I work in the women’s health space and had never heard of it, why are so many of us in the dark about PMDD?

Nurse, specialist sexual health expert and presenter of E4’s The Sex Clinic Sarah Mulindwa is a PMDD sufferer herself and explains that the condition is so little-known because it gets absorbed into the long list of ‘grin and bear it’ experiences that women are expected to face:

“I think that there is a lack of awareness around the topic of PMDD due to the fact that it’s triggered by ovulation, which is as normal a bodily function as breathing for women of childbearing age. PMDD thus becomes almost accepted as being part and parcel of being a women and because it’s not a constant way of being, how much it can affect overall health and wellbeing is significantly underestimated.”

Thankfully more and more women are receiving diagnosis’ and treatment,

with “frank conversations, the connective power of social media and a greater awareness of women’s health issues overall” playing a large part in PMDD being identified and taken seriously. If you suspect you might have it or know someone who does, here’s Sarah’s guide to spotting the signs, seeking treatment and coping strategies………


Read the Full Article at: Get the Gloss

Read more of the web’s most interesting and current women’s health news @ SHEis.com

I would LOVE to hear what you think about this article in the “Leave a Reply” section below.  Let’s get the conversion going….

Stay Strong,

Jaelin Stickels, CNM, WHNP

Owner, SHEis & Holistic Heritage, Spring, TX

 

Other Interesting Articles for you:

Why Female Sexual Dysfunction Therapy is Lacking

A Genetic Mutation Might Explain Why Birth Control Can Fail

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.