THE FOLLOWING RECENT NEWS ARTICLES ARE FOUND FROM AROUND THE WEB.  THEY DO NOT NECESSARILY REPRESENT THE VIEWS OF SHEIS.COM OR ANY OF ITS CONTRIBUTORS (OFTEN, WE COMPLETELY DISAGREE WITH THE ARTICLE).  THESE ARTICLES ARE SIMPLY SHARED TO FURTHER KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING OF WOMENS HEALTH ISSUES.  IT IS OUR HOPE THAT BY SHARING THEM WE WILL ENCOURAGE DISCUSSION AND DEBATE.  PLEASE FEEL FREE TO COMMENT ON ANY OF THEM IN THE COMMENT SECTION BELOW.

 

STAY STRONG,

JAELIN STICKELS, CNM, WHNP-BC, APRN

PRESIDENT & CO-FOUNDER – SHE IS ONLINE, LLC

 

State Medicaid expansions boost coverage, prenatal care among pregnant women

A study in the journal Health Services Research showed that the number of low-income pregnant women who were uninsured declined by 7.9% between 1996 and 2011, when 34 states implemented Medicaid expansions. The findings, based on CDC Pregnancy Risk Assessment and Monitoring survey data, also showed a 0.4% and 1.7% increase in the number of pregnant women receiving earlier and sufficient prenatal care, respectively, during the same period.

United Press International (12/28)

 

Research confirms efficacy of diet, exercise in gestational diabetes prevention

A review in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews showed that pregnant women who participated in a diet and exercise program had a greater gestational diabetes risk reduction than those who did not participate in these programs. Researchers evaluated data from 19 studies involving 6,633 women and found that those in the diet and exercise programs also had less weight gain during pregnancy and a reduced number of births via cesarean section.

Medical News Bulletin (Canada) (12/28)

 

Report calls for early treatment of pregnancy nausea, vomiting

An updated practice bulletin published in Obstetrics & Gynecology calls for clinicians to treat nausea and vomiting in pregnant women as soon as possible to prevent hyperemesis gravidarum. The authors said hyperemesis gravidarum is the most common reason for hospital admission during the first part of pregnancy.

Medscape (free registration) (12/22)

 

Study ties topiramate use during early pregnancy to birth defect risk

A study in Neurology found use of anti-seizure drug topiramate at low doses during the first trimester of pregnancy was associated with a roughly 50% higher risk of cleft palate or cleft lip. The findings were based on a review and analysis of 10 years’ worth of Medicaid data for about 1.4 million women.

HealthDay News (12/27)

 

Study: Most beneficial age for one-time HIV screen in young adults is 25

The best age for Americans who have never been tested for HIV and have no identified risk factors to undergo CDC-recommended one-time HIV screening is 25, according to a study in the Journal of Adolescent Health. The findings were based on an analysis of CDC data on new diagnoses of HIV from 2009 to 2013.

MD Magazine online (12/22)

 

Study ties early menarche to depression, antisocial behavior

Early menarche in girls was associated with higher rates of depressive symptoms and antisocial behaviors in adulthood, according to a study in Pediatrics. Researchers said the association was mostly due to difficulties that began in adolescence and did not resolve over time.

Physician’s Briefing/HealthDay News (12/26)

 

Sexually abused girls more likely to develop genitourinary health problems

Girls who were sexually abused had a 2.1 times and 1.4 times increased likelihood of receiving genital and urinary health problem diagnoses, respectively, up to 12 years after the abuse, compared with girls in the general population, according to a Canadian study in the Journal of Pediatrics. However, the findings didn’t show an association between sexual abuse and genital or urinary problems among boys, or between sexual abuse and the number of STIs.

Medscape (free registration) (12/21)

 

Breast-fed infants with colic may benefit from L. reuteri

Australian researchers examined 345 infants with colic and found that those who were breast-fed and received Lactobacillus reuteri DSM17938 had reduced average crying and/or fussing time as well as a nearly twofold higher likelihood of treatment success, compared with breast-fed babies who received a placebo. However, the findings in Pediatrics showed that L. reuteri treatment didn’t significantly benefit those who were formula-fed.

AAP News (12/30),  Romper (12/30),  Physician’s Briefing/HealthDay News (12/27)

 

Prenatal substance abuse exposure may increase adverse infant health outcomes

Babies whose mothers had substance use disorders during pregnancy were more likely to be born preterm, have low birth weights, develop restricted intrauterine growth and experience cardiac, respiratory and feeding/nutrition problems, compared with those whose mothers didn’t have SUDs, researchers reported in the Journal of Pediatrics. The findings also showed a higher mortality risk and an increased likelihood of rehospitalizations, but reduced odds of observational hospital stays and emergency department care within the first year of life among those whose mothers had SUDs.

Healio (free registration)/Infectious Diseases in Children (12/28)

 

APRNs move closer to full practice authority in 2017 in US

More than 20 states passed bills in 2017 that positively affect health care access and delivery, according to a report in The Nurse Practitioner that showed efforts by individual states toward giving advanced practice registered nurses full practice authority. The report noted “substantial and successful” efforts in South Dakota and in Illinois, which enacted a law providing for full practice authority for APRNs after certification and a transition period that includes collaboration with a physician.

Healthcare Finance News (12/27)

 

Increasing marijuana use found among pregnant women in Calif.

The rate of pregnant women in California who have used marijuana rose from 4.2% in 2009 to 7.1% in 2016, with the biggest increase found among those ages 24 and younger, according to a research letter in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The findings were based on data involving 279,457 pregnant women ages 12 and older in the Kaiser Permanente Northern California health care system.

CNN (12/28),  Newsweek (12/26)

 

Pa. hospital adopts high-tech infant footprint system

Washington Hospital is the first Pennsylvania hospital to use the Newborn Safety System to take digital infant footprints that can help identify babies in cases where they are lost or abducted or during natural disasters. Nurse manager Leslie Gostic said footprints are becoming the “gold standard” for security, and the system gives parents an image that will not age or fade.

Observer-Reporter (Washington, Pa.) (tiered subscription model) (12/27)

 

Study shows benefits of rapid whole genome sequencing for NICU patients

Use of rapid whole genome sequencing in acutely ill patients in neonatal intensive care units improves clinical care and offers substantial cost savings compared with standard care, a study shows. The researchers “eventually [would] like to see rapid WGS as a reimbursable first-tier test for a proportion of infants in the NICU,” said author Shimul Chowdhury.

Clinical Laboratory News (12/2017)

About the author

Jaelin married her high school sweetheart (Ted) in 1984 and is the proud mother of 3 grown children (2 boys & a girl). She has a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas, a Master’s Degree from Georgetown and holds several other professional certifications related to health and wellness; currently, she is working on her Doctorate degree. Jaelin works as a Midwife and Nurse Practitioner at Nativiti Family Birth Center & Women's Health Associates in the Woodlands Texas.