THE FOLLOWING RECENT NEWS ARTICLES ARE FOUND FROM AROUND THE WEB.  THEY DO NOT NECESSARILY REPRESENT THE VIEWS OF SHEIS.COM OR ANY OF ITS CONTRIBUTORS (OFTEN, WE COMPLETELY DISAGREE WITH THE ARTICLE).  THESE ARTICLES ARE SIMPLY SHARED TO FURTHER KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING OF WOMEN’S HEALTH ISSUES.  IT IS OUR HOPE THAT BY SHARING THEM WE WILL ENCOURAGE DISCUSSION AND DEBATE.  PLEASE FEEL FREE TO COMMENT ON ANY OF THEM IN THE COMMENT SECTION BELOW.

 

STAY STRONG,

JAELIN STICKELS, CNM, WHNP-BC, APRN

PRESIDENT & CO-FOUNDER – SHE IS ONLINE, LLC

 

MS Drug Poses Hard Choices for Women Wanting Children

A study in the journal Neurology found women who took natalizumab to manage multiple sclerosis had a greater likelihood of a relapse while pregnant if they stopped the medication before conception. A second study found use of the drug up to 12 weeks gestation was associated with an increased risk of miscarriage and delivering an infant with a lower birth weight and shorter length.

HealthDay News (2/8)

 

Pregnancy Rates in Women Undergoing IVF With Fresh vs Frozen Embryos

Researchers found 142 of 391 women who underwent a first cycle of in vitro fertilization using frozen embryos achieved an ongoing pregnancy, compared with 135 of 391 women who received fresh embryos. The study in The New England Journal of Medicine found median time to conception was shorter among women who received fresh embryos but there was not a significant difference in the live birth rate between the two groups.

Endocrinology Advisor (2/12)

 

Late pregnancy COX-2 inhibitor exposure linked to increased preterm birth risk

Mothers who took COX-2 inhibitors, particularly celecoxib, during late pregnancy were significantly more likely to have preterm births, compared with those who did not take the drugs, Canadian researchers reported in the journal Pain. However, the findings showed no higher odds of premature births among those exposed to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs/COX-2 inhibitors during early pregnancy.

Medscape (free registration)/Reuters (2/8)

 

Do the Macronutrients in a Mother’s Diet Affect the Baby’s Birth Weight?

Each 10 gram per day increase in carbohydrate consumption by a pregnant woman was associated with about a 4 gram increase in her infant’s birth weight, according to a study in the British Journal of Nutrition. Each additional 10 grams of fat a pregnant woman consumed per day was linked to an 8 gram lower birth weight, but there was no association between protein intake and birth weight.

Medical News Bulletin (Canada) (2/12)

 

Breastfeeding Found to Be Protective Against Hypertension

Postmenopausal woman who had breastfed more children or for the longest periods were at lower risk of hypertension compared with women who breastfed the fewest children or for the shortest duration, according to a study in the American Journal of Hypertension. “Our findings endorsed the current recommendations of breastfeeding for the benefit of maternal health in mothers’ later lives,” the researchers wrote.

Physician’s Briefing/HealthDay News (2/8)

 

Women Who Are Most at Risk of Stroke

Research published in the journal Stroke found risk factors for stroke in women include menstruation before age 10, menopause before 45, low dehydroepiandrosterone levels and use of oral contraceptives. Women with a history of pregnancy complications, such as gestational diabetes and hypertension before and after pregnancy, also may have a higher risk of stroke.

HealthDay News (2/8)

Far More U.S. Children Than Previously Thought May Have Fetal Alcohol Disorders

Researchers found that 1.1% to 9.8% of first-grade children had fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, compared with an estimated 1% of youths with FASD in previous studies. The findings in the Journal of the American Medical Association also showed only 2 in 222 FASD cases had received a previous diagnosis, indicating that FASD rates in the US may be greatly underdiagnosed and underreported.

The New York Times (tiered subscription model) (2/6),  TIME online (2/6),  Reuters (2/6)

 

Prenatal, Early Life Fructose Intake Associated With Asthma

The risk of midchildhood asthma, at a median of age of 7.7, was associated with a mother’s consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and fructose during pregnancy, a study published in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society showed. Midchildhood asthma risk also was linked to a child’s fructose consumption around the age of 3.

Physician’s Briefing/HealthDay News (2/9)

 

Expecting Fort Riley moms take advantage of state’s first Centering center

Certified nurse-midwife Jessica Kramer conducts a centering program for pregnant women and partners at Fort Riley, Kan., increasing the total time spent on prenatal care, education and one-on-one visits with a provider and nurse to about 1,200 minutes, compared with 200 minutes using a traditional visit model. Centering coordinators said the model may reduce emergency department visits and promote successful breastfeeding.

WIBW-TV (Topeka, Kan.) (2/7)

 

Delegate proposes breaks for nursing mothers to pump milk

The American College of Nurse-Midwives issued a statement in support of a bill in the Maryland Legislature that would require employers to provide break time and a private area for employees to express breast milk. As in existing federal law, the state bill requires a shielded place other than a bathroom be made available for nursing mothers, but it would cover all employees.

The Frederick News-Post (Md.) (2/6)

Family history increases breast cancer risk regardless of age

A study in JAMA Internal Medicine found women 65 and older who had a first-degree family history of breast cancer were at higher risk of having invasive breast cancer, regardless of the relative’s age of diagnosis. Another study in the same journal found that, regardless of personal history of breast cancer, screening via MRI was associated with greater biopsy rates and lower cancer yield than with mammography.

Healio (free registration) (2/12)

 

Machine learning, fetal MRI analysis IDs patients requiring CSF diversion

Researchers found that fetal MRI analysis with machine learning yielded 82% accuracy, 80% sensitivity and 84% specificity in identifying infants who need to undergo cerebrospinal fluid diversion after birth. The approach, described in JAMA Pediatrics, also had 91% accuracy, 75% sensitivity and 95% specificity in determining candidates for postnatal CSF diversion in a replicated cohort model.

Health Imaging online (2/8)

 

Preemie babies have better outcomes when parents are involved in ICU care: study

Preterm infants whose parents participated in a program where they provided direct care for their babies in the NICU had significantly increased weight gain after 21 days, compared with those who received standard care, Canadian researchers reported in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health. The findings also showed reduced anxiety and stress, as well as increased odds of frequent breastfeeding after discharge among parents in the intervention group.

CTV.ca (Canada) (2/7),  MedPage Today (free registration) (2/7)

 

U.S. progress against sleep-related infant deaths is stalling

Researchers found that the rate of sudden unexpected infant deaths in the US dropped from 154.6 per 100,000 live births in 1990 to 92.4 per 100,000 in 2015, with a 44.6% decline from 1990 to 1998 but only a 7% decrease from 1999 to 2015. Sudden infant death syndrome prevalence declined by 35.8% while the rate of accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed rose by 183.8% during the same period, according to the study in Pediatrics.

Reuters (2/12),  Healio (free registration)/Infectious Diseases in Children (2/12)

***IN THE NEWS – WEEK OF 2/5/18 ****
***IN THE NEWS – WEEK OF 3/5/18 ****

About the author

Jaelin Stickels

Jaelin married her high school sweetheart (Ted) in 1984 and is the proud mother of 3 grown children (2 boys & a girl). She has a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas, a Master’s Degree from Georgetown and holds several other professional certifications related to health and wellness; currently, she is working on her Doctorate degree. Jaelin works as a Midwife and Nurse Practitioner at Nativiti Family Birth Center & Women's Health Associates in the Woodlands Texas.