THE FOLLOWING RECENT NEWS ARTICLES ARE FOUND FROM AROUND THE WEB.  THEY DO NOT NECESSARILY REPRESENT THE VIEWS OF SHEIS.COM OR ANY OF ITS CONTRIBUTORS (OFTEN, WE COMPLETELY DISAGREE WITH THE ARTICLE).  THESE ARTICLES ARE SIMPLY SHARED TO FURTHER KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING OF WOMEN’S HEALTH ISSUES.  IT IS OUR HOPE THAT BY SHARING THEM WE WILL ENCOURAGE DISCUSSION AND DEBATE.  PLEASE FEEL FREE TO COMMENT ON ANY OF THEM IN THE COMMENT SECTION BELOW.

 

STAY STRONG,

JAELIN STICKELS, CNM, WHNP-BC, APRN

PRESIDENT & CO-FOUNDER – SHE IS ONLINE, LLC

 

Cervical Pessary No Help in Preventing Preterm Birth

Preterm births did not decline with the use of a cervical pessary among pregnant women at risk of preterm labor, according to a study reported at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting and published in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology. Compared with a control group, the pessary group saw a trend toward an increase in preterm birth at fewer than 32 weeks gestation.

MedPage Today (free registration) (2/3)

 

More evidence links advanced maternal age to preterm births

Mothers older than 40 had a 14% increased likelihood of having spontaneous preterm delivery and a 31% higher risk of early deliveries due to cesarean births, labor induction and other interventions, compared with those ages 30 to 34, Canadian researchers reported in PLOS ONE. The findings also showed increased odds of prematurity risk factors, such as gestational diabetes, hypertension, obesity and placenta previa, among those over 40.

Reuters (2/2)

 

Single Negative Test Might Not Rule Out Zika Virus Infection

A single negative test may not be enough to rule out Zika virus infection among pregnant women because the “viral load in the mother’s fluids is intermittent and very low, almost at the detection threshold,” a study in Emerging Infectious Diseases shows. The results suggest that “the virus continues replicating during pregnancy, in the fetus or the placenta, which must serve as a reservoir for the pathogen,” said senior author Mauricio Lacerda Nogueira.

Clinical Laboratory News (1/2018)

 

Chronic Diseases Raise Cancer Risk as Much as Lifestyle Does

A Taiwanese study in The BMJ found cardiovascular disease, diabetes, pulmonary disease, chronic kidney disease and gouty arthritis and their markers were contributors to 20.5% of new cancer cases and 38.9% of all cancer deaths, with higher risk scores for these diseases linked to greater risk of liver, kidney, bladder, colorectal, stomach and oral cancers. The findings, based on data for 405,878 people with no history of cancer, showed the increased cancer risk tied to chronic diseases was similar to that associated with all major lifestyle risk factors combined.

Medscape (free registration) (2/1)

 

Antibiotics in pregnancy linked to baby’s increased risk of serious infection

Australian and Danish researchers found that children whose mothers took antibiotics during pregnancy were up to 20% more likely to be hospitalized for infections by age 14, compared with those whose mothers didn’t take antibiotics. The findings in the International Journal of Epidemiology also showed increased odds of infections, especially gastrointestinal infections, among those born vaginally, compared with those born by cesarean section, among those whose mothers took antibiotics during pregnancy.

The Sydney Morning Herald (Australia) (2/5)

 

Low-Carb Diets Boost Risk for Serious Birth Defects

Infants whose mothers reduced or eliminated carbohydrates in their diet during pregnancy had 30% increased odds of developing neural tube defects, such as spina bifida and anencephaly, compared with those whose mothers didn’t limit carbohydrate intake, researchers reported in the journal Birth Defects Research. The findings also showed that pregnant women with restricted carbohydrate intake had a dietary intake of folic acid that was less than 50% of those who didn’t do so.

HealthDay News (1/30)

 

Minority preterm infants born more frequently in hospitals with high morbidity, mortality rates

A study of more than 7,000 very preterm infants born in 39 New York City hospitals found that those who were black and Hispanic had a higher risk of being born in a hospital with high morbidity and mortality rates, compared with those who were white. Researchers reported in JAMA Pediatrics that the hospital where a very preterm infant was born accounted for 40% of the black-white outcomes disparity and 30% of the Hispanic-white outcomes disparity.

Healio (free registration) (2/3)

 

Babies with opioid withdrawal might do better outside the ICU

Babies with neonatal abstinence syndrome who stayed in a room with their mothers had a 63% lower likelihood of receiving pharmacologic treatment such as methadone and morphine and a nearly 10 days shorter hospital stay, compared with those who were treated in the NICU, researchers reported in JAMA Pediatrics. The findings, based on a review and meta-analysis of six studies involving 549 infants with NAS, also showed increased odds of breastfeeding and discharge to home among those in the rooming-in group.

Reuters (2/5),  Healio (free registration)/Infectious Diseases in Children (2/5)

 

No Surprise: Babies Born with NAS Have Smaller Head Circumference

Researchers found that babies with neonatal abstinence syndrome had a mean head circumference that was nearly 1 centimeter smaller than those without NAS. The findings, presented at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s annual meeting, also showed significantly higher prevalence of head circumferences at the 10th percentile or less and the 3rd percentile or less, as well as significantly longer NICU length of stay, among those with NAS.

MedPage Today (free registration) (2/5)

About the Author

Jaelin married her high school sweetheart (Ted) in 1984 and is the proud mother of 3 grown children (2 boys & a girl). She has a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas, a Master’s Degree from Georgetown and holds several other professional certifications related to health and wellness; currently, she is working on her Doctorate degree. Jaelin works as a Midwife and Nurse Practitioner with her business partner Andie Wyrick at Holistic Heritage Homebirth in the Woodlands Texas.