THE FOLLOWING RECENT NEWS ARTICLES ARE FOUND FROM AROUND THE WEB.  THEY DO NOT NECESSARILY REPRESENT THE VIEWS OF SHEIS.COM OR ANY OF ITS CONTRIBUTORS (OFTEN, WE COMPLETELY DISAGREE WITH THE ARTICLE).  THESE ARTICLES ARE SIMPLY SHARED TO FURTHER KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING OF WOMEN’S HEALTH ISSUES.  IT IS OUR HOPE THAT BY SHARING THEM WE WILL ENCOURAGE DISCUSSION AND DEBATE.  PLEASE FEEL FREE TO COMMENT ON ANY OF THEM IN THE COMMENT SECTION BELOW.

 

STAY STRONG,

JAELIN STICKELS, CNM, WHNP-BC, APRN

PRESIDENT & CO-FOUNDER – SHE IS ONLINE, LLC

 

Raised Blood Pressure Before Pregnancy Linked to Miscarriage

Raised Blood Pressure Before Pregnancy Linked to Miscarriage

Elevated blood pressure levels before conception and during early pregnancy were linked with an increased risk of pregnancy loss, according to a study in the journal Hypertension. Prepregnancy blood pressure was not associated with live births or the likelihood of pregnancy.

HealthDay News (4/2),  Healio (free registration)/Cardiology Today (4/2)

 

Anti-TNF use by pregnant women with IBD does not appear to increase infection risk in children

Anti-TNF use by pregnant women with IBD does not appear to increase infection risk in children

Pregnant women with inflammatory bowel disease who took anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha drugs did not increase their child’s short- or long-term risk of severe infection, compared with children who were not exposed to the medications, researchers reported in The American Journal of Gastroenterology. The risk for infection was increased for children born preterm.

Healio (free registration) (3/29)

 

Tele-Monitoring Can Reduce Medical Appointments For Low-Risk Pregnancies

Tele-Monitoring Can Reduce Medical Appointments For Low-Risk Pregnancies

The OB Nest program at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., provides eight clinic visits instead of 12 or 14 for low-risk pregnant women, giving them equipment to monitor their weight, blood pressure and fetal heart rate at home. Dr. Nathaniel DeNicola of the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists’ telehealth task force said an important part of remote monitoring programs is integration with clinical staff.

The Washington Post (tiered subscription model)/Kaiser Health News (3/27)

 

ICE will detain pregnant women, ending previous policy

ICE will detain pregnant women, ending previous policy

A reversal of the US Immigration and Customs Enforcement policy prohibiting detention of pregnant women was outlined in a December memo and implemented last week, according to documents viewed by The Hill. Philip Miller of ICE said 35 pregnant women “subject to mandatory detention” are in custody.

The Hill (3/29)

 

CDC resource provides strategies for preventing sexual violence

CDC resource provides strategies for preventing sexual violence

The CDC’s “Stop SV: A Technical Package to Prevent Sexual Violence”  toolkit includes evidence-based strategies that health care professionals can use to prevent sexual violence. The CDC said 1 in 5 US women experience rape or an attempted rape in their lifetimes, and about 40% experience other forms of sexual violence.

The Nation’s Health (4/2018)

 

Flawed Vaccine Not to Blame for Whooping Cough Resurgence

Flawed Vaccine Not to Blame for Whooping Cough Resurgence

Incomplete pediatric vaccine coverage, gradually waning immunization protection and natural population turnover, but not vaccine shortcomings, are associated with the resurgence of pertussis in the US, according to a study in Science Translational Medicine. The findings also showed that most pertussis cases were transmitted among school-age children, which should prompt pediatric vaccinations before school entry, said researcher Aaron King.

MedPage Today (free registration) (3/29),  HealthDay News (3/29)

 

Metabolic syndrome, diabetes, obesity prevalence highest in Midwest

Researchers evaluated data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey involving 9,824 adults ages 20 to 65 and found that white adults in the Midwest region had a high prevalence of diabetes, metabolic syndrome and obesity, compared with those in the Northeast and West regions. The findings in Nutrition & Diabetes also revealed that black men across the Northeast, Midwest, South and West regions had a high prevalence of diabetes, while black women in the Midwest, Northeast and West regions had the highest MetS prevalence among all women.

Healio (free registration)/Endocrine Today (3/29)

 

Study: Heart disease more common in U.S.-born adults

Study: Heart disease more common in U.S.-born adults

Coronary heart disease and stroke rates were lower for men and women born outside of the US, compared with those born in the US, according to a study in the Journal of the American Heart Association. People born in Asia, Mexico, Central America or the Caribbean had the lowest coronary heart disease rates, while men born in South America or Africa and women born in Europe had the lowest rates of stroke.

United Press International (3/28)

 

Neurogenic Bladder a Consequence of Congenital Zika Syndrome Microcephaly

Neurogenic Bladder a Consequence of Congenital Zika Syndrome Microcephaly

All of the 22 Brazilian babies with congenital Zika syndrome-related microcephaly had neurogenic bladders, 21 of whom had an overactive bladder along with lower bladder capacity, as well as elevated detrusor and leak point pressures, Brazilian researchers reported in PLOS ONE. The findings also showed that 40% had clinically significant increases in postvoid residual, while 23% had urinary tract infections.

Medscape (free registration)/Reuters (3/28)

 

What’s in a word? How language affects public health: Research shows word choices can influence well-being, treatment

What’s in a word? How language affects public health: Research shows word choices can influence well-being, treatment

The words health care professionals use can have significant effects, especially in areas such as addiction and substance abuse, research and experts said. The Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University has trained more than 11,000 professionals in public health, medicine and other fields, and John Kelly at Harvard Medical School helped create the “Addiction-ary,” which contains addiction-related words and terms to help providers select the best words.

The Nation’s Health (4/2018)

 

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Issues Guidance For Treating Pregnant Women With Substance Use Disorders

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Issues Guidance For Treating Pregnant Women With Substance Use Disorders

An online toolkit from Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center is designed to help nurses and physicians provide better care for pregnant women with substance abuse disorders and their infants. Certified nurse-midwife Daisy Goodman of Dartmouth-Hitchcock said there are variations in care for pregnant women with an opioid use disorder and the toolkit will allow providers to implement best practices.

Vermont Public Radio (3/26)

 

CDC: Many Adults Not Receiving Sexual Risk Assessments

CDC: Many Adults Not Receiving Sexual Risk Assessments

A CDC report found 47% of women and 23% of men with recent sexual activity got a sexual risk assessment from their clinician over the past year. Assessment rates varied by age, sexual orientation, poverty-level income, Hispanic origin and race, and health insurance status.

Physician’s Briefing/HealthDay News (3/29)

 

Study links birth interventions to childhood health problems

Study links birth interventions to childhood health problems

Children born by any medical intervention had the highest likelihood of developing eczema, metabolic disorders and respiratory infections by age 5, compared with those born by spontaneous vaginal birth, researchers reported in the journal Birth. The findings also showed an increased post-birth hypothermia risk among those born by C-section and the highest likelihood of metabolic disorders in childhood among those born by emergency C-section, while those who underwent instrumental birth after augmentation or induction were most likely to develop jaundice and feeding problems.

CTV.ca (Canada)/Relaxnews (3/27)

 

Study: Pennsylvania infants suffering opioid withdrawal rose more than 1,000 percent

Study: Pennsylvania infants suffering opioid withdrawal rose more than 1,000 percent

A Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council report found the number of Pennsylvania newborns with neonatal abstinence syndrome increased almost 1,100% from 2000 to 2017. Heritage Valley Beaver nurse manager Melissa Monte said about 300 newborns at the hospital are screened for NAS each year, based on whether their mother tests positive or is expected to test positive for opioid use.

LancasterOnline (Pa.) (3/28),  Ellwood City Ledger (Pa.) (3/29)

 

Where does your state stand on shackling of pregnant incarcerated women?

Where does your state stand on shackling of pregnant incarcerated women?

Pregnant incarcerated women have been identified as a particularly high-risk group and among the most vulnerable women in the United States. In an article in Nursing for Women’s Health, authors provide an overview of the potential negative health outcomes that can result from shackling pregnant women and suggest strategies to promote optimal health care for incarcerated women. Read the article in Nursing for Women’s Health.

 

New study reveals infants at higher risk of dying in their sleep when with a babysitter

New study reveals infants at higher risk of dying in their sleep when with a babysitter

Researchers examined 1,375 sudden infant death cases under nonparental supervision and found that only 49.1% of babysitters, 29.4% of relatives and 27.1% of friends adhered to recommendations to place babies to sleep in a crib or bassinet, compared with 72.5% of licensed child care providers. The findings in the Journal of Pediatrics also showed that the recommended supine sleeping position for infants was followed by only 38.4% of relatives, 38.6% of friends and 37.8% of babysitters, compared with 54.1% of providers.

WJLA-TV (Washington, D.C.) (4/2),  HealthDay News (4/2)

 

Genetic Mutation Linked to Cot Death

Genetic Mutation Linked to Cot Death

An extremely rare genetic mutation involving a protein associated with breathing muscles has been found in some babies who have died from sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDS, according to findings published in The Lancet. “In the population we studied, the evidence is strong that it is at the very least a risk factor in those cases that had it,” said Michael Hanna, a study co-author.

The Scientist online (3/29)

About the author

Jaelin married her high school sweetheart (Ted) in 1984 and is the proud mother of 3 grown children (2 boys & a girl). She has a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas, a Master’s Degree from Georgetown and holds several other professional certifications related to health and wellness; currently, she is working on her Doctorate degree. Jaelin works as a Midwife and Nurse Practitioner at Nativiti Family Birth Center & Women's Health Associates in the Woodlands Texas.