THE FOLLOWING RECENT NEWS ARTICLES ARE FOUND FROM AROUND THE WEB.  THEY DO NOT NECESSARILY REPRESENT THE VIEWS OF SHEIS.COM OR ANY OF ITS CONTRIBUTORS (OFTEN, WE COMPLETELY DISAGREE WITH THE ARTICLE).  THESE ARTICLES ARE SIMPLY SHARED TO FURTHER KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING OF WOMEN’S HEALTH ISSUES.  IT IS OUR HOPE THAT BY SHARING THEM WE WILL ENCOURAGE DISCUSSION AND DEBATE.  PLEASE FEEL FREE TO COMMENT ON ANY OF THEM IN THE COMMENT SECTION BELOW.

 

STAY STRONG,

JAELIN STICKELS, CNM, WHNP-BC, APRN

PRESIDENT & FOUNDER – SHE IS ONLINE, LLC

 

Memphis midwives work to address racial disparities in care

More women in America die from pregnancy-related complications than in any other developed country in the world, and black women are most affected. This video reports on one clinic in Memphis, Tennessee, where midwives are working to facilitate better outcomes by bringing holistic care to women of color.

 

AGA working group to address myths about IBD, pregnancy

AGA working group to address myths about IBD, pregnancy

The American Gastroenterological Association, the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine are working to address myths concerning pregnancy and inflammatory bowel disease. The groups plan to develop a clinical care pathway for the different specialties that treat women with IBD who are planning to have children.

Healio (free registration) (5/18)

 

Conception Tougher for Couples When Male Partner Is Depressed

Conception Tougher for Couples When Male Partner Is Depressed

Researchers found depression in men, but not women, was associated with a reduced likelihood of pregnancy for couples struggling to conceive, according to a study in the journal Fertility and Sterility. Women treated for infertility had more than triple the risk of first-semester miscarriage if they also took a non-selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, while SSRIs were not linked to miscarriage risk.

HealthDay News (5/18)

 

Inducing Labor at Full Term May Be Best Bet

Inducing Labor at Full Term May Be Best Bet

Researchers found that women who received labor induction at or beyond 41 weeks of gestation had fewer cesarean sections, perinatal deaths and stillbirths, compared with those who waited for labor to begin. However, the findings in the Cochrane Library, based on a review of 30 studies involving 12,000 women, showed similar prevalence of postpartum bleeding, perineal trauma, duration of maternal hospital stays and infant NICU admission in both groups.

The New York Times (tiered subscription model) (5/17)

 

US, EU Warn About Birth Defect Risk From Dolutegravir

US, EU Warn About Birth Defect Risk From Dolutegravir

The FDA urged health providers to detail dolutegravir’s benefits and risks to women of childbearing age with HIV, administer pregnancy testing before medication initiation and consider other antiretroviral drugs, while the European Medicines Agency advised that the drug shouldn’t be prescribed for those who are trying to get pregnant, after preliminary study data showed higher odds of neural tube defects among infants whose mothers took dolutegravir. Both agencies said women taking the drug should use contraception but shouldn’t stop treatment before physician consultation.

Medscape (free registration) (5/18)

 

Most Teens, Young Women Satisfied With IUD Insertion

Most Teens, Young Women Satisfied With IUD Insertion

A study in Obstetrics & Gynecology showed that 76.8% of teen and young adult women said they were highly satisfied with intrauterine device insertion, while 83.2% believed that the IUD was worth the discomfort and 67.4% reported they would recommend the procedure to a friend. The findings also showed reduced odds of high overall satisfaction among adolescents, compared with young adults, and those who had never had a gynecologic examination, compared with those who had.

Physician’s Briefing/HealthDay News (5/18)

 

SCVD common in women with type 1 diabetes

SCVD common in women with type 1 diabetes

A study presented at the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists’ annual meeting found type 1 diabetes was associated with a significantly increased risk of systemic collagen vascular diseases among women in comparison with men. The findings, based on medical chart reviews and patient questionnaire responses for 1,167 patients with type 1 diabetes, showed that those who also had an SCVD were at a greater risk of celiac disease, hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism and other autoimmune diseases.

Family Practice News (5/18)

 

AHA: ‘Ideal’ Heart Health Eludes More Americans

AHA: 'Ideal' Heart Health Eludes More Americans

The number of people with an ideal cardiovascular health score, based on seven lifestyle and biological measures, decreased from 8.5% to 5.9% from 1991 to 2008, according to a study in the Journal of the American Heart Association. Researchers said the decrease was due mainly to poorer scores for body mass index, blood pressure, blood glucose and cholesterol.

HealthDay News (5/17)

 

Infant Infection Risk Unchanged with In Utero Anti-TNF Exposure

Infant Infection Risk Unchanged with In Utero Anti-TNF Exposure

Canadian researchers found that babies whose mothers received anti-tumor necrosis factor treatment for rheumatoid arthritis during pregnancy didn’t have an increased likelihood of developing serious infections, compared with those whose mothers had RA but didn’t take anti-TNFs and those whose mothers didn’t have RA. The findings were published in Arthritis & Rheumatology.

MedPage Today (free registration) (5/17)

 

Fetal Growth, Maternal Anger Impact Infant Regulation

Fetal Growth, Maternal Anger Impact Infant Regulation

Researchers found that poor prenatal growth and greater maternal postnatal anger had significant indirect effects on reactivity and regulation among babies. However, the findings in the journal Child Development, based on data involving 247 mother-infant pairs, showed that prenatal risk didn’t have significant direct impact on infant reactivity and regulation.

Physician’s Briefing/HealthDay News (5/16)

 

Naps during pregnancy may be linked with healthier birth weight

Naps during pregnancy may be linked with healthier birth weight

Women in China who reported taking naps lasting an hour to an hour and a half during pregnancy had a 29% lower risk of having a baby with low birth weight than those who didn’t take naps, researchers reported in Sleep Medicine. The findings, based on data from 10,000 women collected from 2012 to 2014, also showed a 22% lower likelihood of having a baby with low birth weight among those who napped five to seven days weekly.

Reuters (5/15)

 

Can ultrasound screen for fetal growth restriction?

Can ultrasound screen for fetal growth restriction?

A study of 406 pregnancies diagnosed with fetal growth restriction found second-trimester ultrasound screening did not reliably predict low birth weight, with only 35% of the FGR-diagnosed neonates below the 10th percentile for birth weight. Incorrect diagnoses of FGR are linked to higher rates of induced labor and cesarean delivery.

AuntMinnie (free registration) (5/15)

***IN THE NEWS – WEEK OF 5/14/18 ***
*** SHE is a Deal Hunter - Week of 5/21/18 ***

About the author

Jaelin Stickels

Jaelin married her high school sweetheart (Ted) in 1984 and is the proud mother of 3 grown children (2 boys & a girl). She has a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas, a Master’s Degree from Georgetown and holds several other professional certifications related to health and wellness; currently, she is working on her Doctorate degree. Jaelin works as a Midwife and Nurse Practitioner at Nativiti Family Birth Center & Women's Health Associates in the Woodlands Texas.