She is in the News – Headlines for the Week of 6/12/18



Defying Prevention Efforts, Suicide Rates Are Climbing Across the Nation

Defying Prevention Efforts, Suicide Rates Are Climbing Across the Nation

The average annual rate of suicide among individuals ages 10 and older in the US rose by 25% between 1999 and 2016, increasing by a low of 6% in Delaware to over 57% in North Dakota, according to a CDC Vital Signs report. Contributing factors include social isolation, poor access to mental health care, misuse of drugs and alcohol, and gun ownership; and common precursors include termination of a relationship, financial problems and substance abuse.

The New York Times (tiered subscription model) (6/7),  HealthDay News (6/7)


Mifepristone Pre-Tx Improves Management of Early Miscarriage

Mifepristone Pre-Tx Improves Management of Early Miscarriage

A combination of oral mifepristone followed by vaginal misoprostol was associated with higher rates of complete expulsion and lower rates of uterine aspiration after a first-term pregnancy loss compared with treatment with misoprostol alone, according to a study in The New England Journal of Medicine. A randomized trial of 300 women found 83.8% in the mifepristone pretreatment group had complete expulsion versus 67.1% of women in the misoprostol-only group.

Physician’s Briefing/HealthDay News (6/6),  MedPage Today (free registration) (6/6)


WHO lauds India’s success in reducing maternal mortality

WHO lauds India's success in reducing maternal mortality

Efforts to improve access to maternal health services have reduced India’s maternal mortality rate by 77% between 1990 and 2016, the World Health Organization reports. “India has shown impressive progress in reducing maternal deaths, with nearly 1000 fewer women now dying of pregnancy related complications each month in India as compared to 2013,” says UNICEF’s India representative Yasmin Ali Haque.

BloombergQuint (India)/Indo-Asian News Service (6/10),  NDTV (India)/Asian News International (6/10)


Blood Test Might Predict Pregnancy Due Date and Preterm Birth

Blood Test Might Predict Pregnancy Due Date and Preterm Birth

Researchers found that a new blood test detecting RNA changes in the blood of pregnant women correctly identified premature pregnancies in six of eight women with preterm deliveries, as well as yielded similar accuracy as ultrasound and greater accuracy than predictions based on a woman’s last menstrual period in determining pregnancy due dates. The test, described in the journal Science, “gives us a starting point to understand the biology of what is going on in premature births,” said researcher Stephen Quake.

The New York Times (tiered subscription model) (6/7),  TIME online (6/7)


After High School, Young Women’s Exercise Rates Plunge

After High School, Young Women's Exercise Rates Plunge

Fewer teenage girls than boys report meeting recommended exercise levels, and the disparity widens after high school, a study published in JAMA Pediatrics found. Around 78% of high-school girls say they are physically active, but only 62% of young women say they are, compared with 88% of boys and 73% of young men, respectively, while researchers say cultural norms and distribution of resources may be factors.

National Public Radio (6/11),  HealthDay News (6/11)


Endometriosis is more severe for obese women, study finds

Endometriosis is more severe for obese women, study finds

Australian researchers looked at more than 500 women with endometriosis and found that those with obesity had disease severity scores two times greater than women with healthy weight. The findings were published in the Journal of Endometriosis and Pelvic Pain Disorders.

The Guardian (London)/Australian Associated Press (6/12)


Pre-Pregnancy Programs May Improve Outcomes in Women With Type 2 Diabetes

Pre-Pregnancy Programs May Improve Outcomes in Women With Type 2 Diabetes

A study in Diabetologia showed women with type 2 diabetes who participated in community-based pre-pregnancy care programs were more likely to achieve an HbA1C target of below 48 mmol/mol than those who did not participate in these programs. Researchers used a cohort of 4,558 women and found participation in the PPC program also led to an improvement in pregnancy preparation measures and improved folic acid supplementation among type 2 diabetes patients, while those with type 1 diabetes presented earlier for antenatal care during and after the intervention.

Endocrinology Advisor (6/11)


Circumcision in infants with hydronephrosis tied to lower UTI risk

Circumcision in infants with hydronephrosis tied to lower UTI risk

A study in Pediatrics found newborn circumcision was associated with a reduced likelihood of urinary tract infections among infants with hydronephrosis. One UTI case is prevented for every 10 boys with hydronephrosis undergoing circumcision, compared with one case prevented for every 83 healthy boys circumcised, researchers reported.

Healio (free registration)/Infectious Diseases in Children (6/7)


‘Where The Need Is’: Tackling Teen Pregnancy With A Midwife At School

'Where The Need Is': Tackling Teen Pregnancy With A Midwife At School

A Washington, D.C., high school has adopted a midwife program to help address the school’s above-average teen pregnancy rate. The midwife is available to offer care to pregnant girls and answer students’ questions about sex and contraception.

National Public Radio (6/11)


Are Lower Oxygen Targets Tied to Higher Death Rates in Preemies?

Are Lower Oxygen Targets Tied to Higher Death Rates in Preemies?

Extremely preterm infants treated with lower oxygen saturations had a similar likelihood of primary composite outcome of death or major disability at ages 18 months to 24 months as those who received higher oxygen saturations, Australian researchers reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The findings showed increased odds of mortality and severe necrotizing enterocolitis, but lower risk of retinopathy of prematurity treatment among those in the lower oxygen target group.

MedPage Today (free registration) (6/5),  Physician’s Briefing/HealthDay News (6/5)


Tablets shown to be a strong replacement for insulin in treating neonatal diabetes

Tablets shown to be a strong replacement for insulin in treating neonatal diabetes

UK and European researchers conducted a 10-year follow-up study of 81 infants with neonatal diabetes from 20 countries and found that switching from regular insulin injections to glibenclamide tablets was associated with long-term blood glucose control with patients experiencing only mild side effects after the switch. The study in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology also found that the average HbA1C before the switch was 8.1%, while the average HbA1C after 10 years of sulphonylurea treatment was 6.4%.

Diabetes (UK) (6/5)


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STAY STRONG,

JAELIN STICKELS, CNM, WHNP-BC, APRN

PRESIDENT & FOUNDER – SHE IS ONLINE, LLC

 

 

 

About the Author

Jaelin Stickels

Jaelin married her high school sweetheart (Ted) in 1984 and is the proud mother of 3 grown children (2 boys & a girl). She has a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas, a Master’s Degree from Georgetown and holds several other professional certifications related to health and wellness; currently, she is working on her Doctorate degree. Jaelin works as a Midwife and Nurse Practitioner with her business partner Andie Wyrick at Holistic Heritage Homebirth in the Woodlands Texas.