Every week we scour the internet looking for articles and videos related to women’s health issues.  We aggregate all of that research here so it is all in one place for you.  We would love to hear from you on any of the content below.

Headlines for the week of 8/25/18 are:

 

Should I Call the Midwife?

Should I Call the Midwife?

The percentage of births attended by midwives has increased almost every year since 1989, according to the American College of Nurse-Midwives, and research shows women who deliver using a midwife have comparable birth outcomes and fewer medical interventions. Certified nurse-midwife Laurie MacLeod said the difference in philosophy between physicians and midwives can be seen in longer appointment times, relationship building, patient education and the fact that midwives are with women throughout their labor and delivery.

U.S. News & World Report (6/18)

 

The race to prevent the sudden death of mothers in childbirth in the U.S.

About 700 women die each year in the U.S. due to complications from pregnancy or giving birth, according to the CDC, which Dr. Neel Shah is hoping to change.

 

No strong evidence linking vitamin D levels and preeclampsia

No strong evidence linking vitamin D levels and preeclampsia

A study in The BMJ found a woman’s vitamin D status had no association with the risk of gestational hypertension or preeclampsia, no matter the genetic risks for vitamin D deficiency. The findings were based on analyses of data from studies including more than 16,000 women.

Family Practice News (6/21)

 

NSAID use early in pregnancy increases miscarriage risk

NSAID use early in pregnancy increases miscarriage risk

A study in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology found women who used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs early in their pregnancy were at an increased risk of having miscarriage, compared with acetaminophen users and women who did not use either drug. The findings, based on 1,097 women, showed using the drugs within the first 2 weeks of gestational age was associated with a 1.89 hazard ratio for miscarriage, and using them longer than two weeks was associated with a 2.10 hazard ratio.

Family Practice News (6/22)

 

Trauma to Mother, Baby With Operative Vaginal Delivery on the Rise in Canada

Trauma to Mother, Baby With Operative Vaginal Delivery on the Rise in Canada

Fewer vaginal deliveries in Canada include the use of forceps or vacuum methods, but trauma to mothers and babies during the procedures has increased, according to a study in the Canadian Medical Association Journal. “Our results suggest that encouraging higher rates of forceps and vacuum delivery as a strategy to decrease the cesarean delivery rate could lead to substantial increases in obstetric trauma and severe birth trauma,” said researcher Giulia Muraca of the University of British Columbia.

Medscape (free registration)/Reuters (6/21)

 

Severity of Mom's Diabetes May Up Autism Risk in Their Kids

Severity of Mom’s Diabetes May Up Autism Risk in Their Kids

Having type 1, type 2 or gestational diabetes mellitus at or before 26 weeks of pregnancy was associated with increased risk that offspring would develop autism spectrum disorder, compared with not having diabetes, according to a study presented at the American Diabetes Association meeting and published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. However, researchers didn’t associate GDM diagnosed after 26 weeks of pregnancy to a significantly higher pediatric ASD risk.

MedPage Today (free registration) (6/23)

 

ACIP Issues Flu Season Guidance, Anthrax Vax in a 'Mass Event'

ACIP Issues Flu Season Guidance, Anthrax Vax in a ‘Mass Event’

The CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices approved the use of live attenuated influenza vaccine for the 2018-2019 flu season and recommended that vaccinations be given to all individuals ages 6 months and older, but American Academy of Pediatrics representatives advised the continued use of inactivated influenza vaccine as the first choice of immunization. The use of anthrax vaccination during a mass event was also unanimously approved by the ACIP.

MedPage Today (free registration) (6/20)

 

Parents Say Cancer Prevention Best Reason for HPV Vaccination

Parents Say Cancer Prevention Best Reason for HPV Vaccination

A survey of parents found cancer prevention was the most convincing reason health care providers could give for getting children vaccinated against human papillomavirus, while preventing a common infection and having lasting benefits also garnered support, researchers wrote in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention. The worst reasons providers gave included telling parents the vaccination was a scientific breakthrough and that they had their own child vaccinated.

Physician’s Briefing/HealthDay News (6/21)

 

Cryptosporidium infection stunts kids’ growth

Cryptosporidium infection stunts kids’ growth

Researchers reported in The Lancet Global Health that episodes of Cryptosporidium infection-related diarrhea with were associated with decreases in height-for-age, weight-for-age and weight-for-height z-scores among children. Children ages 28 days to 364 days are particularly affected by Cryptosporidium, and infection burden is highest in sub-Saharan Africa, the study team said.

Healio (free registration)/Infectious Disease News (6/24)

 

Many Women Report Vasomotor Symptoms in Their 60s

Many Women Report Vasomotor Symptoms in Their 60s

A Mayo Clinic survey of 4,956 women who received menopause consultations found that 41% of those older than 60 reported moderate-to-severe vasomotor symptoms, according to a study in Menopause. The study also found 21% were taking hormone therapy and were less likely to report vasomotor symptoms.

Physician’s Briefing/HealthDay News (6/19)

 

Neonatal neuroimaging with strong negative predictive value for developmental outcomes: The NEURO study

Neonatal neuroimaging with strong negative predictive value for developmental outcomes: The NEURO study

Researchers found that adverse late cranial ultrasound findings among extremely preterm infants were an independent risk factor for full scale IQ scores below 70 at ages 6 to 7, while both adverse neonatal late CUS and MRI findings were independently linked to higher odds of moderate-to-severe disability in childhood. The findings in Pediatrics also showed that adverse CUS and MRI findings had a poor positive predictive value but good to excellent negative predictive value for both FSIQ scores lower than 70 and MTSD.

2 Minute Medicine (6/26)

 

Outpatient Care Less Efficient for Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome

Outpatient Care Less Efficient for Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome

Babies with neonatal abstinence syndrome who were discharged on outpatient pharmacotherapy had a shorter initial hospital length of stay but longer therapy duration, compared with those who received inpatient pharmacotherapy, researchers reported in The Journal of Pediatrics. The findings also showed increased prevalence of emergency department visits within six months among those on outpatient pharmacotherapy.

Physician’s Briefing/HealthDay News (6/22)

 

Kids Meet a Midwife

Kids Meet | HiHo Kids

 


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THE ATTACHED RECENT NEWS ARTICLES ARE FOUND FROM AROUND THE WEB.  THEY DO NOT NECESSARILY REPRESENT THE VIEWS OF SHEIS.COM OR ANY OF ITS CONTRIBUTORS (OFTEN, WE COMPLETELY DISAGREE WITH THE ARTICLE).  THESE ARTICLES ARE SIMPLY SHARED TO FURTHER KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING OF WOMEN’S HEALTH ISSUES.  IT IS OUR HOPE THAT BY SHARING THEM WE WILL ENCOURAGE DISCUSSION AND DEBATE.  PLEASE FEEL FREE TO COMMENT ON ANY OF THEM IN THE COMMENT SECTION BELOW.

 

STAY STRONG,

JAELIN STICKELS, CNM, WHNP-BC, APRN

PRESIDENT & FOUNDER – SHE IS ONLINE, LLC

About the Author

Jaelin Stickels
Certified Nurse Midwife at | 281-296-3043 | jaelin@sheis.com | + posts

Jaelin married her high school sweetheart (Ted) in 1984 and is the proud mother of 3 grown children (2 boys & a girl). She has a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas, a Master’s Degree from Georgetown and holds several other professional certifications related to health and wellness; currently, she is working on her Doctorate degree. Jaelin works as a Midwife and Nurse Practitioner with her business partner Andie Wyrick at Holistic Heritage Homebirth in the Woodlands Texas.