THE FOLLOWING RECENT NEWS ARTICLES ARE FOUND FROM AROUND THE WEB.  THEY DO NOT NECESSARILY REPRESENT THE VIEWS OF SHEIS.COM OR ANY OF ITS CONTRIBUTORS (OFTEN, WE COMPLETELY DISAGREE WITH THE ARTICLE).  THESE ARTICLES ARE SIMPLY SHARED TO FURTHER KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING OF WOMENS HEALTH ISSUES.  IT IS OUR HOPE THAT BY SHARING THEM WE WILL ENCOURAGE DISCUSSION AND DEBATE.  PLEASE FEEL FREE TO COMMENT ON ANY OF THEM IN THE COMMENT SECTION BELOW.

 

STAY STRONG,

JAELIN STICKELS, CNM, WHNP-BC, APRN

PRESIDENT & CO-FOUNDER – SHE IS ONLINE, LLC

 

Breastfeeding could reduce risk of diabetes in women, study finds

Researchers found that mothers who breastfed their babies for at least six months had a 48% reduced risk of developing diabetes, compared with those who did not breastfeed at all. The findings in JAMA Internal Medicine, based on 1,238 mothers without diabetes at baseline, revealed that 10 of every 1,000 women who did not breastfeed at all developed diabetes every year, which declined to less than seven cases per 1,000 women who breastfed babies for up to six months.

Reuters (1/16)

Late-pregnancy SSRIs raise behavioral risks for children

The use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors by women during late pregnancy was associated with a higher risk of anxious/depressed behaviors in children at age 5, according to a study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry. The higher risk was not seen among women who took SSRIs in early and mid-pregnancy.

Healio (free registration)/Psychiatric Annals (1/16)

 

Review: Aripiprazole not contraindicated during pregnancy

A literature review in the Journal of Affective Disorders found taking aripiprazole to treat bipolar disorder or schizophrenia is not contraindicated during pregnancy or lactation. Even though the benefits outweighed the risks, researchers recommended clinicians do an individualized risk-benefit analysis before prescribing the drug to patients.

Psych Congress Network/Reuters (1/16)

First stage of labor longer than expected, study in Africa finds

Pregnant African women had a longer first stage of labor, compared with expected dilation rates of one centimeter per hour, but many still had a vaginal birth and did not require labor intervention or augmentation, researchers reported in PLOS Medicine. The research mirrors findings in studies in other regions.

Science News (1/16)

Researchers question whether womb is a sterile environment

Research has found signs of nonpathogenic bacteria in the placenta, amniotic fluid and meconium, but researchers are divided between the long-held belief that the womb is sterile and the idea that a microbiome forms after conception.

Nature (free content) (1/17)

Influenza vaccination is important to prevent flu spread

It is important for people to get vaccinated against influenza, even if the risk of getting the flu is low, to protect themselves and others because the virus spreads easily and can have severe health consequences, including death, writes Aaron Carroll, a pediatrics professor at the Indiana University School of Medicine. The CDC reported that vaccination during the 2015-2016 flu season prevented about 3,000 deaths, 5 million flu cases, 2.5 million health care visits and 70,000 hospitalizations.

The New York Times (free-article access for SmartBrief readers) (1/15)

Study supports single HIV screening at age 25

A study in the Journal of Adolescent Health found that compared with current recommendations, a one-time HIV screening at age 25 was cost-effective and associated with improved outcome measures. Screening teens without risk factors at age 18 or younger was found to be a less efficient strategy.

Healio (free registration) (1/16)

Preterm birth may increase odds of poor language development in childhood

Researchers found that premature infants had less developed primary and nonprimary auditory cortices at 40 weeks’ gestation, compared with those born full-term. The findings in the journal eNeuro, based on MRI scans involving 105 babies, also showed that delayed nonprimary auditory cortex development among those born preterm was associated with language delays at age 2.

Xinhua News Agency (China) (1/16)

Urinalysis shows promise in diagnosing UTI in febrile infants

A study in Pediatrics showed that urinalysis yielded at least 90% sensitivity and specificity in identifying febrile infants with urinary tract infection, with even higher sensitivity among those with bacteremia. The findings were based on 2008 to 2013 data involving 4,147 febrile babies ages 60 days and younger.

2 Minute Medicine (1/16)

Trump to create HHS division for health workers with religious, moral objections

The Trump administration is set to unveil a plan to protect health care workers from participating in services that violate their religious beliefs or consciences. Supporters say the move will protect the religious liberties of medical workers, while detractors say it will endanger women, transgender people and other vulnerable groups.

The Washington Post (tiered subscription model) (1/17)

***IN THE NEWS – WEEK OF 1/1/18 ****
***IN THE NEWS – WEEK OF 1/29/18 ****

About the author

Jaelin Stickels

Jaelin married her high school sweetheart (Ted) in 1984 and is the proud mother of 3 grown children (2 boys & a girl). She has a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas, a Master’s Degree from Georgetown and holds several other professional certifications related to health and wellness; currently, she is working on her Doctorate degree. Jaelin works as a Midwife and Nurse Practitioner at Nativiti Family Birth Center & Women's Health Associates in the Woodlands Texas.