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Cesarean rates lower at hospitals with more midwives, N.Y. study finds

An analysis of data from 126 hospitals in New York state found women giving birth at facilities where more than 40% of births are attended by midwives had lower rates of cesarean delivery and episiotomy, compared with hospitals that had no midwife-attended births, researchers wrote in the Journal of Midwifery and Women’s Health. “This study is contributing to a body of research which shows that good outcomes for women at low risk in childbirth go hand-in-hand with lower use of medical procedures,” said researcher Laura Attanasio.

HealthDay News (11/16) 

 

Air pollution exposure tied to miscarriage risk in study

A study in the journal Fertility and Sterility found regular exposure to smog was associated with a 10% increase in risk of miscarriage. Researcher Pauline Mendola of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development said air pollution could harm fetal or placental development or interfere with implantation in the uterus.

HealthDay News (11/16) 

 

Preterm birth rates higher with in vitro fertilization

Conception through in vitro fertilization is associated with about 80% increased rates of spontaneous preterm birth, according to a study in Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology. Researchers said placental development may be a factor and recommended ultrasound cervical screening and preventive strategies.

Healio (free registration) (11/17) 

 

Maternal obesity linked to larger babies

Obese women were more likely to give birth to infants who have longer thigh and upper arm bones and a birth weight above the 90th percentile, compared with women who are not obese, a study in JAMA Pediatrics found. A researcher said the study highlights the importance of having a healthy body weight before pregnancy.

Romper (11/13) 

 

Study evaluates breast cancer screening in overweight women  

Overweight or obese women are more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer after a tumor has grown to more than 2 centimeters and may need more frequent screenings, according to a study to be presented at the Radiological Society of North America’s annual meeting. Women with a BMI higher than 25 have a poorer prognosis when breast cancer is diagnosed between regular screenings, compared with normal weight women.

HealthDay News (11/20) 

 

Research finds late menopause may raise risk of type 2 diabetes

A study in the Journal of Diabetes Investigation showed that Chinese women who completed natural menopause at age 53 or older had a 1.25 times higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those who completed menopause from ages 46 to 52. Chinese researchers used a cohort of 17,076 postmenopausal women and found that the association between diabetes and later age at natural menopause did not differ by body mass index, physical activity, smoking or use of contraception.

Healio (free registration)/Endocrine Today (11/16) 

 

Pediatric flu vaccinations tied to reduced flu hospitalization risk

Children ages 6 months to 23 months and those ages 2 years to 4 years who were fully vaccinated against influenza were 48% and 67% less likely to be hospitalized due to flu, respectively, compared with those who weren’t vaccinated, Canadian researchers reported in PLOS ONE. The findings also showed a 39% lower odds of flu-related hospitalization among those who were partially vaccinated.

HealthDay News (11/17) 

 

Women face danger giving birth during natural disasters

Pregnant women face danger and uncertainty giving birth during natural disasters, such as hurricanes, and certified nurse-midwife Robbie Prepas, who co-chairs the Disaster Preparedness and Response Caucus for the American College of Nurse-Midwives, is concerned about what happens to women who are cut off from their families. Prepas said some aid groups provide birthing kits during a disaster and families can make their own, but there still can be complications and post-birth problems.

CNN (11/16) 

 

Prenatal famine exposure may adversely affect mental health in adulthood

Adults whose mothers were affected by the 1944 to 1945 famine in the Netherlands during pregnancy had significantly poorer mental health, compared with those whose mothers were pregnant before and after the famine, researchers reported in the journal Aging and Mental Health. The findings also showed that women’s mental health was more affected by prenatal famine exposure than men’s.

Medical News Today (11/17) 

 

Study: Women living near green space have lower mortality rates

Women who live near green areas tend to live longer, according to a study by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. The study found such women were less likely to die of cancer and respiratory illnesses.

San Jose Mercury News (Calif.) (11/17) 

 

Experts seek solutions to high maternal death rate for blacks

Black women for decades have been significantly more likely than white women to die of pregnancy or birth complications in the US, and experts suggest it could stem from poorer overall health, higher rates of chronic illness, socioeconomic issues, access to health care, education levels and stress. A Tuesday meeting at the CDC in Atlanta brought together health care professionals, officials and others to discuss maternal death, racial disparities and solutions such as standardized protocols called patient safety bundles.

CNN (11/15) 

 

This Common Drug Is Being Used for Childbirth—and It’ll Have You Laughing through Labor

If you’re having a baby, we’ve got great news about a brand-new way of getting you through those painful contractions. And it doesn’t involve a spinal tap or needles, but it is going to make you laugh.  Readers Digest

***In the News - Week of 11/14/17 ****
***IN THE NEWS – WEEK OF 11/27/17 ****