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STAY STRONG,

JAELIN STICKELS, CNM, WHNP-BC, APRN

PRESIDENT & CO-FOUNDER – SHE IS ONLINE, LLC

 

Study compares safety of injected, oral medications for gestational diabetes

Researchers evaluated 99 studies of pregnant women with gestational diabetes and infants born to mothers with GD and found no difference in the risk for type 2 diabetes development, preeclampsia or birth by cesarean section between women who received insulin and oral medications. The findings in Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews  also showed no differences in the risk for infant mortality, infant hypoglycemia or childhood adiposity at 18 months between women who received insulin injections or oral medications.

Endocrinology Advisor (12/8)

 

High sugar intake during pregnancy raises child’s asthma risk

Women who consumed high levels of sugar and sugar-sweetened beverages during pregnancy increased the risk their children would develop asthma, compared with women with the least sugar intake, according to a study in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society. Researcher Sheryl Rifas-Shiman said the reason for the association is not known but avoiding high sugar intake during pregnancy may help reduce the risk of childhood asthma.

The New York Times (free-article access for SmartBrief readers) (12/8),  Physician’s Briefing/HealthDay News (12/8)

 

CDC reports rising flu activity

CDC researchers reported higher-than-average influenza activity, which began increasing early last month, especially in the South, with the predominant strain being influenza A (H3N2). Widespread activity has been reported in Arkansas, Louisiana, Georgia, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Massachusetts and Virginia during the week ending Dec. 2, according to a study in the agency’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

CNN (12/8),  Physician’s Briefing/HealthDay News (12/8)

 

Study: 5% weight loss could help reduce breast cancer risk

A study at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium found that women who lose 5% or more of their body weight after menopause may reduce their risk of breast cancer by about 12%. Weight gain after menopause was associated with an increase in the risk for triple negative breast cancer.

HealthDay News (12/8)

 

ADA releases 2018 medical care standards for diabetes

Type 2 diabetes patients with established atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease who don’t meet glycemic targets with metformin and lifestyle modification should be given a glucose-lowering drug with proven cardiovascular benefit and/or mortality reduction, such as liraglutide or empagliflozin, according to the American Diabetes Association’s 2018 guidelines published in Diabetes Care. Children and adolescents who are overweight or obese and have one or more additional risk factors should also be screened for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, the ADA recommends.

Medscape (free registration) (12/8)

 

Study links obesity in women to higher risk of rosacea

Obese women may be at higher risk of developing rosacea, researchers wrote in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. The study also found higher waist circumference and hip circumference were associated with a higher risk of rosacea, independent of body mass index.

Physician’s Briefing/HealthDay News (12/8)

 

Most high-risk babies don’t receive rotavirus vaccine in hospital

Two-thirds of high-risk infants who were age-eligible for routine pentavalent human-bovine reassortant rotavirus vaccination weren’t immunized before hospital discharge, 42.6% of whom were no longer age-eligible after discharge, researchers reported in Pediatrics. The findings also showed no transmission of vaccine-type rotavirus between vaccinated and unvaccinated babies, and researchers suggested that postponing rotavirus immunization until discharge may result in missed vaccination opportunities.

Medscape (free registration)/Reuters (12/7)

 

Study: Rural and urban home, birthing center births safe

The risk of complications for home births or birthing center deliveries attended by midwives in rural areas was no higher than in urban areas, according to a study in the journal Birth. There was no substantial difference in rates of vaginal deliveries aided by instruments, and 95% of rural women and 94% of urban women had normal spontaneous vaginal deliveries.

Medscape (free registration)/Reuters (12/7)

 

Women with Parkinson’s disease less likely to have caregiver

Data showed 88.4% of men with Parkinson’s disease had a caregiver, compared with 79.4% of women, and caregiver strain was greater for those caring for men, according to a study in Neurology. Women were less likely than men to have a caregiver accompany them for a baseline medical visit and had a faster rate to using a paid caregiver.

Physician’s Briefing/HealthDay News (12/5)

 

Study: Oral birth control tied to increase in breast cancer risk

A study published in The New England Journal of Medicine found women taking newer versions of oral birth control have a 20% increased risk of breast cancer, compared with women who are not on hormonal contraception, but the absolute risk remains very low. The risk with current estrogen/progestin birth control pills is similar to risks seen with progestin-only pills and IUDs that release progestin, researchers found.

HealthDay News (12/6)

 

Antibiotics in labor/delivery not tied to infant seizures in Colo. study

A chart review of Colorado birth certificate data from 2007 to 2015 found that antibiotics given during labor and delivery were not significantly associated with neonatal seizures after risk factors were accounted for, researchers reported at the American Epilepsy Society annual meeting. Risk factors for infant seizures included hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, antibiotics given to infants to treat suspected sepsis and the presence of congenital abnormalities.

eMPR (12/4)

 

 

Longitudinal study of insomnia symptoms among women during perimenopause

Insomnia symptoms are prevalent in women during perimenopause, and the stage of perimenopause may heighten the risk of developing symptoms. In an article in JOGNN, authors examine differences in self-reported insomnia symptoms at different stages of perimenopause over 10 years. Read the abstract in JOGNN.

 

Nurses wear sensors so researchers can study ICU workflow

University of Missouri researchers studied the workflow of ICU nurses by having them wear near-field electromagnetic ranging system sensors during their shifts. Engineering professor Jung Hyup Kim says workflow problems or heavy workloads detected by the tracking system can be addressed to help nurses perform their duties better and safer.

MobiHealthNews (12/6)

 

 

 

***IN THE NEWS – WEEK OF 12/4/17 ****
***IN THE NEWS – WEEK OF 12/18/17 ****