THE FOLLOWING RECENT NEWS ARTICLES ARE FOUND FROM AROUND THE WEB.  THEY DO NOT NECESSARILY REPRESENT THE VIEWS OF SHEIS.COM OR ANY OF ITS CONTRIBUTORS (OFTEN, WE COMPLETELY DISAGREE WITH THE ARTICLE).  THESE ARTICLES ARE SIMPLY SHARED TO FURTHER KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING OF WOMENS HEALTH ISSUES.  IT IS OUR HOPE THAT BY SHARING THEM WE WILL ENCOURAGE DISCUSSION AND DEBATE.  PLEASE FEEL FREE TO COMMENT ON ANY OF THEM IN THE COMMENT SECTION BELOW.

 

STAY STRONG,

JAELIN STICKELS, CNM, WHNP-BC, APRN

PRESIDENT & CO-FOUNDER – SHE IS ONLINE, LLC

 

Elevated maternal blood glucose in pregnancy may increase heart defect risk

Researchers linked every 10 mg per deciliter increase in maternal blood glucose levels during pregnancy to an 8% higher likelihood of having infants with cardiac malformations, even after adjusting for maternal age, pre-existing maternal diabetes and pre-pregnancy body mass index. The findings in the Journal of Pediatrics  were based on data involving 19,107 mother-child pairs.

The New York Times (free-article access for SmartBrief readers) (12/15)

 

Study: Magnetic field radiation tied to miscarriage risk

Pregnant women exposed to higher levels of magnetic field non-ionizing radiation, from sources such as cell phones, wireless networks and power lines, may have a 2.72 times higher risk of miscarriage, according to a study in Scientific Reports. The study did not prove cause and effect, but 10.4% of women in the lowest quartile of exposure miscarried, compared with 24.2% percent of the rest of the women in the cohort.

San Francisco Chronicle (tiered subscription model) (12/17)

 

Study: Bivalent meningococcal B vaccine effective after 2 and 3 doses

A study in the New England Journal of Medicine found a bivalent meningococcal B vaccine that targets factor H-binding protein was safe and effective after two and three doses. The vaccine was tested in adolescents and young adults.

Physician’s Briefing/HealthDay News (12/14)

 

Study: Consistent midlife activity reduces joint symptoms in women

A 12-year study of Australian women found that consistent, even if modest, levels of activity in midlife protected against self-reported joint symptoms, with a stronger protective effect among obese women. The study in Arthritis Care & Research found menopausal status or hormone therapy did not appear to affect the protective effects of exercise.

MedPage Today (free registration) (12/15)

 

Self-administered acupressure relieves menstrual cramp pain in study

A smartphone app that guides women through acupressure might reduce women’s need for drugs to treat menstrual cramp pain, researchers reported in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology. The app is based on expert consensus, and women who used it for three months had lower pain scores, were less likely to use pain medications and experienced fewer days with menstruation-related pain than those who used a sham app.

Reuters (12/8)

 

CDC reports on early childhood difficulties among infants with Zika

CDC researchers followed 19 Brazilian infants with Zika-related microcephaly until ages 19 months to 24 months and found all had one or more adverse outcomes, which included sleeping problems, feeding challenges, vision and hearing abnormalities, severe motor impairment and nonfebrile seizures. The findings in the agency’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report also showed three to five adverse events in 12 of the children, while 2 had experienced all of the adverse outcomes.

TIME online (12/14),  Healio (free registration)/Infectious Disease News (12/14)

 

Survey: 97% of nurse-midwives happy with career choice

A 2017 Medscape survey found the majority of 10,523 nurses were satisfied with their careers, including 97% of nurse-midwives who said they were glad they became a nurse. The survey found 68% of nurse-midwives said they would choose the same educational preparation.

Medscape (free registration) (12/13

 

Judge blocks enforcement of new birth control coverage exemptions

A federal judge has granted Pennsylvania’s request for an injunction temporarily blocking enforcement of Trump administration rules that would allow more employers to stop offering coverage of contraceptives at no additional cost on moral or religious grounds. Judge Wendy Beetlestone said the regulation introduces “sweeping” exemptions, calling them the “proverbial exception that swallows the rule.”

ABC News/The Associated Press (12/15)

 

Study looks at induced labor for women with prepregnancy obesity

A study in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology found that rates of cesarean delivery and severe maternal or neonatal morbidity among obese women at 39 to 41 weeks of gestation were lower with induced labor than with expectant management, but rates of operative vaginal delivery were higher at weeks 39 and 40. The findings were based on data from the 2007 to 2011 California Linked Patient Discharge Data-Birth Cohort File, and researchers said the results may not be generalizable beyond the study population.

Medscape (free registration) (12/12)

 

Living near fracking site may increase low birth weight risk

Infants whose mothers lived within half of a mile of hydraulic fracturing operations during pregnancy were 25% more likely to have low birth weight, compared with those whose mothers lived at least 2 miles from fracking sites, researchers reported in the journal Science Advances. The findings, based on data involving more than 1.1 million births in Pennsylvania, also showed lower birth weights among babies whose mothers lived between half a mile and 2 miles from fracking sites, but not among those whose mothers lived beyond 2 miles from such sites.

The Washington Post (tiered subscription model) (12/13),  HealthDay News (12/13)

 

Prenatal ADHD drug intake linked to higher odds of heart defects in babies

A study in JAMA Psychiatry found that infants whose mothers took the attention-deficit/hyperactivity drug methylphenidate during the first trimester of pregnancy had a 28% higher likelihood of developing cardiac malformations, compared with those whose mothers didn’t take the drug. However, the findings, based on data involving more than 4.3 million pregnancies and births in the US and five Nordic countries, showed no increased heart defect risk among those whose mothers received amphetamines.

CNN (12/13),  Physician’s Briefing/HealthDay News (12/13),  Healio (free registration)/Psychiatric Annals (12/13)

***IN THE NEWS – WEEK OF 12/11/17 ****
***IN THE NEWS – WEEK OF 1/1/18 ****