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Congenital syphilis increase tied to lack of prenatal care

Rates of congenital syphilis are increasing in the US, with 15.7 cases per 100,000 live births. Dr. Joseph Bocchini Jr. of Louisiana State University told the 2017 Infectious Diseases in Children Symposium that most women who give birth to infants with congenital syphilis either did not have prenatal care or had late prenatal care, or had the disease diagnosed too late in pregnancy to complete therapy, representing a failure in the health care system to identify and treat infected pregnant women.

Healio (free registration)/Infectious Diseases in Children (11/29)

 

Supplements lower placental inflammation in obese pregnant women

Obese pregnant women taking docosahexaenoic acid supplements showed reduced placental inflammation, along with amino acid transport expression and activity, compared with women who did not take the supplements, according to a study in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. Women taking supplements had higher DHA levels in erythrocyte and placental membranes, but insulin sensitivity, inflammatory status and lipid levels were not affected.

Healio (free registration)/Endocrine Today (11/28)

 

Maternal exposure to allergenic foods may protect offspring

Breast milk from mothers exposed to allergenic foods may have a prophylactic effect, preventing infants from having an allergy response to the foods, according to animal research published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine. Researchers said the food protein combines with the mother’s antibodies, which are transferred to offspring, causing them to produce allergen-specific T immune cells.

NutraIngredients (12/4)

 

Flushable pregnancy test due to hit US market in mid-2018

Lia Diagnostics said the FDA approved its flushable pregnancy test, to be available in mid-2018, offering women a more environmentally sustainable, disposable and convenient way to determine if they are pregnant. Although the test works the same as other pregnancy tests, the applicator is made of special paper that disperses in water and is biodegradable, so it can be flushed.

TechCrunch (12/4)

 

First US birth by woman with transplanted uterus reported

A woman with a transplanted uterus has given birth in the US. This is the first such birth to take place outside of Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Gothenburg, Sweden.

The New York Times (free-article access for SmartBrief readers) (12/2)

 

Researchers compare diabetes prevalence between men, women

The overall crude diabetes prevalence across ethnic groups was 6.9% among men and 3.7% in women, with the difference persisting after standardizing for age, body mass index, lifestyle factors and socioeconomic status, according to a study in Diabetic Medicine. Researchers analyzed data from the UK Biobank involving 489,079 adults ages 40 to 69 and found that in a subgroup analysis of South Asian participants, Bangladeshi men had the highest prevalence of diabetes, followed by Pakistani and Indian men, compared with women.

Healio (free registration)/Endocrine Today (12/4)

 

Study finds no link between severe weight loss or gain, mortality in RA

A study in Arthritis & Rheumatology found severe weight loss among women around the time of diagnosis with rheumatoid arthritis was associated with a mortality increase, but the risk was about the same for women with similar weight loss but without rheumatoid arthritis. The findings, based on data for 121,701 participants in the Nurses’ Health Study, did not indicate a significant association between severe weight gain and mortality.

MedPage Today (free registration) (11/30)

 

Heart disease risk tied to high sugar diet, researchers say

Researchers analyzed data from old and new studies and found that diets containing more than 25% of calories from added sugars were associated with a threefold increased risk for cardiovascular mortality, compared with diets containing less than 10% of calories from added sugars. The findings, published in Open Heart, showed that added sugars may lead to the development of chronic heart disease and other CV complications via insulin resistance.

Diabetes (UK) (12/4)

 

Newborns in Pain Might Not Show It

Babies with higher levels of stress had greater brain activity in response to pain, according to a study in Current Biology. Researchers said the response did not result in a change in infant behavior, suggesting caregivers could underestimate an infant’s pain experience.

HealthDay News (11/30)

 

Midwife strives to empower women to make informed decisions

When a pregnant woman enters the hospital it is important to provide her with the information she needs to be empowered to make informed labor and birth decisions, said Adelicia Graham, a certified nurse-midwife in Tennessee. Giving patients knowledge to help them live healthier lives also is an important part of care, Graham said, and providing physical exams and birth control options is needed just as much as attending births and providing labor support.

Daily Nurse (12/4)

 

Most Americans don’t get enough choline, study finds

A study in Nutrients found that fewer than 9% of adults in the US get enough choline in their diets on a daily basis, and people who did not eat eggs were the most likely to get too little of the nutrient. Choline deficiency in pregnant women can cause neural tube defects and suboptimal brain development in infants, Taylor Wallace, a nutrition and food studies professor, said.

Shape.com (11/30)

 

Cognitive outcomes have worsened among extremely preterm, ELBW infants

Researchers found that babies born extremely premature or with extremely low birth weight in the early 2000s had increased rates of executive functioning deficits, particularly in working memory and planning and organizing skills, at ages 7 to 8 than those born in the early and late 1990s, when compared with controls born at term. The findings were published in Pediatrics.

2 Minute Medicine (12/1)

 

NICU inborn admissions don’t correlate with illness severity

NICU inborn admissions for infants born at 34 weeks gestation or more accounted for 79.2% of all inborn NICU admissions, but rates varied by 34-fold across NICUs, a study in JAMA Pediatrics showed. The researchers also found a negative correlation of inborn NICU admission rate with the percentage of high illness acuity, which accounted for just 11.9% of inborn NICU admissions born at 34 weeks or more gestation.

Medscape (free registration) (12/4)

 

 

 

***IN THE NEWS – WEEK OF 11/27/17 ****
***IN THE NEWS – WEEK OF 12/11/17 ****