Every week the SHEis.com team scours the internet looking for news articles and videos related to women’s health issues.  We aggregate all that research here, so it is all in one place for you.  We would love to hear from you on any of the content below.

SHE is in the News – Headlines for the Week of 10/1/18:

Featured Article(s)

Other Great Articles

Featured Article(s)

EMS and Midwives: Navigating the Out-of-Hospital Transfer

EMS and Midwives: Navigating the Out-of-Hospital Transfer

Since the beginning of time, there have been references to women helping women give birth, the Old English definition of midwifery. Midwifery continues today and in fact is increasing in the U.S.: Out-of-hospital births now account for approximately 6% of American births, up from 1% in the 1960s. There were almost 60,000 out-of-hospital births in the U.S. in 2014. While most occurred in home settings, 18,000 were in birth centers, which are freestanding, homelike facilities designed for the midwifery model of pregnancy and birth.

As more and more women seek alternative ways to normalize birth due to the ever-rising rate of interventions like c-sections (now at an astounding national average of 34%), midwifery care will continue to grow. This article discusses what a midwife is and how EMS and midwives can work together.

Read the full story at: EMS World (9/27)

Jaelin’s Comments: This is a really well written article explaining the different types of midwives and their scope of practice.  The article is written explaining the needed relationship between EMS and the growing demand for out-of-hospital births.  Now about 6% of all birth in the US are happening outside of hospitals and that number continues to grow year on year.  This “New” reality requires and understanding by EMS professionals of the protocols and challenges of out-of-hospital birth.  From my experience, most EMS professionals really try to be helpful but in many cases, they just are not well educated in this new paradigm.

 

Breastfeeding might benefit babies by reducing stress

Breastfeeding might benefit babies by reducing stress

Mothers have long been told that “breast is best” when it comes to feeding newborn babies, but a small experiment suggests at least some of the benefits may have nothing to do with the milk itself.

Pediatricians recommend that mothers exclusively breastfeed infants until they’re at least 6 months old because it can bolster babies’ immune systems and reduce their risk of ear and respiratory infections, sudden infant death syndrome, allergies, obesity and diabetes. While there’s plenty of research documenting these benefits, less is known about exactly how breastfeeding might cause these improvements in babies’ health, researchers note in Pediatrics.

Read the full story at: Reuters (9/26)

Jaelin’s Comments: Yet another reason why “Breast is Best”!  But seriously, does this really come as a shock to anyone?  All you have to do is observe any mother and child taking part in this magical experience to understand that there is more than just feeding going on here.  It is nice that science is starting to agree… 


Other Great Articles

AFFIRM: Fetal Movement Awareness Effort Doesn’t Reduce Stillbirth

AFFIRM: Fetal Movement Awareness Effort Doesn't Reduce Stillbirth

An intervention to increase pregnant women’s awareness of reduced fetal movement does not have the desired effect of reducing rates of stillbirth delivery, and in fact, is associated with an increased risk of cesarean section, induced labor, and prolonged time in the neonatal unit, according to new research said to represent the largest study of fetal movement awareness to date.

Read the full story at: Medscape (free registration) (9/28)

 

One-Step Gestational Diabetes Diagnosis of Little Benefit

One-Step Gestational Diabetes Diagnosis of Little Benefit

Gestational diabetes diagnoses shot up 41% after a healthcare system switched from recommending a two-step to a one-step screening method — but without clinically identifiable benefits to mothers or newborns —finds a new study published in the October issue of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

Read the full story at: Medscape (free registration) (9/27)

 

New mums less likely to suffer postpartum depression if get enough exposure to daylight

New mums less likely to suffer postpartum depression if get enough exposure to daylight

Pregnancy and childbirth is a beautiful experience, but it leaves many women with postpartum depression.

A recent study suggests that women in late pregnancy during darker months of the year may have a greater risk of developing postpartum depression once their babies are born.

This is consistent with what is known about the relationship between exposure to natural light and depression among adults in the general population. The study suggests the need to increase at-risk women to increase their exposure to natural daylight and vitamin D.

Read the full story at: The Economic Times (9/29)

 

New Bill Targets Medicaid Coverage of Maternity Telehealth Programs

New Bill Targets Medicaid Coverage of Maternity Telehealth Programs

Congress is considering new legislation to strengthen Medicaid support for maternity care programs delivered through telemedicine.

The Maximizing Outcomes for Moms through Medicaid Improvement and Enhancement of Services (MOMMIES) Act, introduced this week by U.S. Senators Cory Booker (D-NJ), Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY), Tammy Baldwin (D-WI), Ben Cardin (D-MD), Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) and Kamala Harris (D-CA), aims to improve care for pregnant women covered by Medicaid, which accounts for about half of the nation’s pregnancies.

Read the full story at: mHealth Intelligence (9/26)

 

Report on bodily fluids shows Zika persistence in semen

Report on bodily fluids shows Zika persistence in semen

A final report on the persistence of Zika virus in bodily fluids from people in Puerto Rico today in the New England Journal of Medicine highlighting results from the ZIKV Persistence (ZiPer) cohort study suggests that, for the vast majority of men, Zika RNA is cleared from semen within 4 months.

The study was based on 295 people in Puerto Rico infected with Zika beginning in May 2016. Only patients with symptomatic Zika, confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were included. Researchers collected samples of serum, urine, saliva, semen, and vaginal secretions weekly for the first month and at 2, 4, and 6 months after diagnosis.

Read the full story at: Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (9/27)

 

Ovarian cancer: Newer birth control pills may lower risk

Ovarian cancer: Newer birth control pills may lower risk

In the United States, ovarian cancer has the highest mortality rate of all gynecologic cancers, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

In 2014, for instance, over 21,000 new cases of ovarian cancer occurred, at least 14,000 of which resulted in death.

Previous research has suggested that combined oral contraceptives — that is, birth control pills that contain both estrogen and progestogen — may lower the risk of ovarian cancer in women of reproductive age..

Read the full story at: Medical News Today (9/28)

 

Death Rates for Young Americans Drop, But Still Too High

Death Rates for Young Americans Drop, But Still Too High

While death rates among infants, teens and young adults in the United States have dropped in recent decades, they’re still higher than in other developed countries, a new study finds.

“Despite overall reduced mortality, striking racial disparities still exist for infant, child and youth mortality in the U.S., and there has been a concerning increase in death rates due to suicide and drug overdoses among youth,” said senior study author Meredith Shiels. She’s an investigator with the U.S. National Cancer Institute’s division of cancer epidemiology and genetics..

Read the full story at: HealthDay News (10/1)

 

Half of women ‘will develop dementia or Parkinson’s or have a stroke’

Half of women 'will develop dementia or Parkinson's or have a stroke'

One in two women will develop dementia or Parkinson’s disease, or have a stroke, in their lifetime, new research suggests.

About a third of men aged 45 and half of women of the same age are likely to go on to be diagnosed with one of the conditions, according to a study of more than 12,000 people.

Read the full story at: The Guardian (London) (10/1)

 

Drinking Enough Water Could Be Key to Avoiding UTIs

Drinking Enough Water Could Be Key to Avoiding UTIs

Women plagued by recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) may look no farther than their kitchen tap for relief, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that women who drank plenty of water had a significant reduction in their odds for a recurrence of the common infections.

“This study provides convincing evidence that increased daily intake of water can reduce frequent UTIs,” said lead researcher Dr. Thomas Hooton. He’s clinical professor of medicine in the division of infectious diseases at the University of Miami.

Read the full story at: HealthDay News (10/1)

 

Need for Adequate Screening for Infants With HCV Infected Mothers During Pregnancy

Need for Adequate Screening for Infants With HCV Infected Mothers During Pregnancy

The prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) among pregnant women with substance use disorders is high, and better strategies to effectively screen and link women and their exposed infants to HCV care and treatment are needed, according to a study published in the Journal of Pediatrics.

Read the full story at: Infectious Disease Advisor (9/26)

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STAY STRONG,

JAELIN STICKELS, CNM, WHNP

PRESIDENT & FOUNDER – SHE IS ONLINE, LLC

About the Author

Jaelin Stickels

Jaelin married her high school sweetheart (Ted) in 1984 and is the proud mother of 3 grown children (2 boys & a girl). She has a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas, a Master’s Degree from Georgetown and holds several other professional certifications related to health and wellness; currently, she is working on her Doctorate degree. Jaelin works as a Midwife and Nurse Practitioner with her business partner Andie Wyrick at Holistic Heritage Homebirth in the Woodlands Texas.