Every week the SHEis.com team scours the internet looking for news articles and videos related to women’s health and midwife issues.  We aggregate all that research here, so it is all in one place for you.  We would love to hear from you on any of the content below.  If you are short on time, I have selected 1-3 “Featured Articles” that particularly caught my attention and I have commented on them.  Those are on my must-read list.

 

SHE is in the News – Headlines for the Week of 10/15/18:

Featured Article(s)

Other Great Articles

 

Featured Article(s)

C-section deliveries nearly doubled worldwide since 2000, study finds

C-section deliveries nearly doubled worldwide since 2000, study finds

No matter where a family lives, welcoming a baby into the world can be a joyous occasion — yet how a woman experiences birth varies drastically from country to country.

The number of births by cesarean section is on the rise, climbing from about 16 million (12.1% of all births) in 2000 to 29.7 million (21.1% of all births) in 2015, according to a study published Thursday in the journal The Lancet.

 

Read the full story here: CNN (10/11)

Jaelin’s Comments:  These rates should be alarming to everyone.  We have doubled the rate of c-section but have not improved maternal and infant mortality.  Can anyone really tell me that 1 in 4 women internationally (1 in 3 in the US) are physically incapable of birthing their children vaginally, I call BS!  The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that the appropriate range for world wide c-section rates should be between 10% to 15% (I think it should be even lower than that).  Don’t get me wrong, when it is NECESSARY c-section is an amazing and lifesaving surgery, but it is way over used.  I will not speculate here why these rates are climbing as I suspect the answer is complicated; however, as they say in politics “follow the money”!


Major Childbirth Complications More Likely for Black Women

Major Childbirth Complications More Likely for Black Women

Black women have the highest risk of life-threatening birth complications in the United States, a new study finds.

Compared to whites, black women had a 70 percent higher rate of major birth problems, the University of Michigan researchers reported.

Celebrities like Serena Williams who have shared their birth-related emergency stories publicly have drawn the national spotlight to the urgent need to reduce racial and ethnic disparities in care for women around the time of delivery,” said study lead author Dr. Lindsay Admon. She said studies like this one are needed to drive and target those changes.

 

Read the full story here: HealthDay News (10/10)

Jaelin’s Comments: It is a shame it takes an “almost” tragic event of a celebrity for us to pay any attention to this national disgrace.  There is no reason why in this country this should be happening.  I can tell you however, that while I worked in a hospital environment I witness subtle racism in the way that women of color were treated.  They were, in many cases, not listened to or respected the way the white women patients were.  I talked to my nurse supervisor about it and was told that it was in my head and not a problem.  Again, because the differences in care were subtle it was very hard to pinpoint for specific verifiable complaints, but I know what I saw….  This data bear out that this is an issue across this country that needs to be addressed NOW!


Other Great Articles

Vaccination reduces flu-related hospitalization risk in pregnant women by 40%

Vaccination reduces flu-related hospitalization risk in pregnant women by 40%

Vaccination reduced the risk that pregnant women would experience influenza-related hospitalization by 40% during six recent influenza seasons, according to results from a multinational study published in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

“Expecting mothers face a number of threats to their health and the health of their baby during pregnancy, and getting the flu is one of them,” Allison L. Naleway, PhD, senior investigator and associate director of science programs in the Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research, said in a news release. “This study’s findings underscore the fact that there is a simple, yet impactful way to reduce the possibility of complications from flu during pregnancy: get a flu shot.”

 

Read the full story here: Healio (free registration)/Infectious Disease News (10/12)


Outcomes of Primary Hyperparathyroidism Treatments During Pregnancy

Outcomes of Primary Hyperparathyroidism Treatments During Pregnancy

Patients who develop primary hyperparathyroidism during pregnancy predominantly treat the condition medically, but surgery is an option. The results of a retrospective chart review analyzing maternofetal outcomes for both treatment options were published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.

Researchers in this study evaluated 28 pregnancies for maternal characteristics and pregnancy and neonatal outcomes. Maternal characteristics included demographic information, health history, blood assays, and medical or surgical treatment of hyperparathyroidism details. Pregnancy outcomes included information on delivery, gestational age, and any delivery complications. Neonatal outcomes included birth weight, hypocalcemia, and neonatal intensive care unit stays.

Read the full story here: Endocrinology Advisor (10/9)


Asthma during pregnancy tied to postpartum depression risk

Asthma during pregnancy tied to postpartum depression risk

Women who have asthma during their pregnancies are more likely to experience postpartum depression after delivery, a large Canadian study suggests.

Physicians should watch for signs of depression in their pregnant patients with asthma so treatment and coping strategies can start early, the authors write in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice

 

Read the full story here: Reuters (10/11)


Does Breastfeeding Hormone Protect Against Type 2 Diabetes?

Does Breastfeeding Hormone Protect Against Type 2 Diabetes?

The hormone prolactin — most commonly associated with breastfeeding — may play a role in reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that women with the highest levels of the hormone, though still in the normal range, had a 27 percent reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes compared to those with the lowest levels in the normal range.

“Prolactin is a multi-function hormone — it is not only related to pregnancy and breastfeeding, it also plays an important role in many other biological functions, like metabolism, immune regulation and water balance,” said study lead author Jun Li. She is a post-doctoral research fellow at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston.

Read the full story here: HealthDay News (10/11)


Percentage of young U.S. children who don’t receive any vaccines has quadrupled since 2001

Percentage of young U.S. children who don’t receive any vaccines has quadrupled since 2001

A small but increasing number of children in the United States are not getting some or all of their recommended vaccinations. The percentage of children under 2 years old who haven’t received any vaccinations has quadrupled in the last 17 years, according to federal health data released Thursday.

Overall, immunization rates remain high and haven’t changed much at the national level. But a pair of reports from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention about immunizations for preschoolers and kindergartners highlights a growing concern among health officials and clinicians about children who aren’t getting the necessary protection against vaccine-preventable diseases, such as measles, whooping cough and other pediatric infectious diseases.

Read the full story here: The Washington Post (tiered subscription model) (10/11)


Medtech reporting would change under new opioid law

Medtech reporting would change under new opioid law

A section of the recently-passed bill to address the opioid crisis could have implications for medtech.

The 250-page Substance Use-Disorder Prevention that Promotes Opioid Recovery and Treatment for Patients and Communities Act (SUPPORT for Patients and Communities Act) contains a provision that would require manufacturers of certain medical devices, drugs and biologics covered by Medicare, Medicaid, or the Children’s Health Insurance Program to report payments or other transfers of value made to “covered recipients.”

Read the full story here: MassDevice (Boston) (10/10)


Being overweight or obese in your 20s and 30s could cut life expectancy by up to 10 years

Being overweight or obese in your 20s and 30s could cut life expectancy by up to 10 years

New Australian research has found that people who are obese during their 20s and 30s could risk losing up to ten years in life expectancy, with men at risk of losing more years than women.

Carried out by researchers at The George Institute for Global Health and the University of Sydney and published in the International Journal of Obesity, the new study used a microsimulation model of obesity progression in Australia to calculate the expected amount of weight that adults will put on every year depending on their age, sex and current weight.

Read the full story here: Inquirer (10/15)


Maternal Tdap Vaccination and Neonatal Immunity, Timing Key

Maternal Tdap Vaccination and Neonatal Immunity, Timing Key

Maternal immunization with tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine early in the third trimester results in higher pertussis antibody concentrations in neonates compared with earlier or later immunization during pregnancy, according to a study published in the October 9 issue of JAMA.

“Pertussis toxin antibody concentrations at birth were sufficiently high in infants born to Tdap-immunized mothers that, even allowing for the natural decay of maternal antibodies, most infants would have had substantial antibody levels until initiation of the primary vaccine series, thus reducing their risk of pertussis-related mortality and morbidity,” write lead author C. Mary Healy, MD, from the Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, and colleagues.

Read the full story here: Medscape (free registration) (10/9)


Premature babies face higher risk of maltreatment, study finds

Premature babies face higher risk of maltreatment, study finds

Infants born before 37 weeks of gestation face a higher rate of maltreatment, according to a study published in Annals of Epidemiology.

For the study, researchers compared birth certificates and discharge records from hospital births of New York City residents between1995-2004. They also examined infants who were hospitalized within 12 months of their delivery. Researchers looked for 33 diagnosis codes commonly linked to maltreatment to identify alleged cases of infant maltreatment.

Read the full story here: Becker’s Hospital Review (10/12)


Recurrence of Group B Streptococcal infection similar in shortened and prolonged therapy

The rates of Group B Streptococcal (GBS) bacteremia recurrence in infants with an initial course of late-onset infection who received shortened and prolonged IV antibiotic therapy were 1.8% and 2.3%, respectively. There was no significant difference in the adjusted absolute difference between these 2 rates.

Read the full story here: 2 Minute Medicine (10/11)

********************

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:

THE ATTACHED RECENT NEWS ARTICLES ARE FOUND FROM AROUND THE WEB.  THEY DO NOT NECESSARILY REPRESENT THE VIEWS OF SHEIS.COM OR ANY OF ITS CONTRIBUTORS (OFTEN, WE COMPLETELY DISAGREE WITH THE ARTICLE).  THESE ARTICLES ARE SIMPLY SHARED TO FURTHER KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING OF WOMEN’S HEALTH ISSUES.  IT IS OUR HOPE THAT BY SHARING THEM WE WILL ENCOURAGE DISCUSSION AND DEBATE.  PLEASE FEEL FREE TO COMMENT ON ANY OF THEM IN THE COMMENT SECTION BELOW.

 

ALSO, NONE OF THE CONTENT OF THE ARTICLES SHOWN ABOVE ARE THE INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY OF SHEIS.COM; OUR TEAM SIMPLY AGGREGATES THE STORIES FROM AROUND THE INTERNET INTO ONE PLACE, MAKING FINDING THEM EASIER ON YOU.  ALL CONTENT SHOWN REMAINS THE PROPERTY OF THE ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTOR.

 

STAY STRONG,

JAELIN STICKELS, CNM, WHNP

PRESIDENT & FOUNDER – SHE IS ONLINE, LLC

About the Author

Jaelin Stickels

Jaelin married her high school sweetheart (Ted) in 1984 and is the proud mother of 3 grown children (2 boys & a girl). She has a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas, a Master’s Degree from Georgetown and holds several other professional certifications related to health and wellness; currently, she is working on her Doctorate degree. Jaelin works as a Midwife and Nurse Practitioner with her business partner Andie Wyrick at Holistic Heritage Homebirth in the Woodlands Texas.