Every week the SHEis.com team scours the internet looking for news articles and videos related to women’s health and midwife issues.  We aggregate all that research here, so it is all in one place for you.  We would love to hear from you on any of the content below.  If you are short on time, I have selected 1-3 “Featured Articles” that particularly caught my attention and I have commented on them.  Those are on my must-read list.

SHE is in the News – Headlines for the Week of 10/22/18:

Featured Article(s)

Other Great Articles

Featured Article(s)

Organic foods tied to slightly lower cancer risk

Organic foods tied to slightly lower cancer risk

People who eat more organic foods may be slightly less likely to develop certain cancers, a French study suggests.

Compared to people who consumed the least amount of organic foods, people who consumed the most were 25 percent less likely to develop cancer during the study. In absolute terms, this translated into about a 0.6 percent lower risk of cancer..

Read the full story here: Reuters (10/22)

Jaelin’s Comments:  This is a really good example why you need to be wary of what you read or see on the news.  This same study is reported on CNN’s website today under the headline “You can cut your cancer risk by eating organic, a new study says”  However, if you read this Reuters version of the article (or better yet the actual study) what you find out is the evidence is thin that there is a correlation and even then at best it a small improvement.  Don’t get me wrong, I think eating as organic as possible is a good idea, but misleading people is wrong, and it is one of the big reasons why people are skeptical of the media.

Other Great Articles

CDC: Many Pregnant Women Not Receiving Immunizations

CDC: Many Pregnant Women Not Receiving Immunizations

Many pregnant women are not getting recommended vaccinations, with less than half of those pregnant during the peak influenza vaccination period in 2017 to 2018 reporting being vaccinated before or during their pregnancy, according to research published in the Sept. 28 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Read the full story here: Physician’s Briefing/HealthDay News (10/18)

 

Exercise during pregnancy can reduce risk of major complications, U of A-led research finds

Exercising while pregnant could decrease the chances of developing a major complication by at least 25 per cent, according to new University of Alberta-led research.

The research is part of the 2019 Canadian Guideline for Physical Activity Throughout Pregnancy — the first guideline of its kind since 2003.

Margie Davenport is a cardiovascular health researcher at the U of A and was one of the lead researchers for the project.

“We found that women who exercise during pregnancy had a 40 per cent reduction in the risk of developing gestational diabetes, gestational hypertension and preeclampsia,” she said, noting the research didn’t find exercise increased the risk of having a miscarriage, small baby, or preterm birth.

Read the full story here: CBC News (Canada) (10/18)

Mediterranean diet-based nutrition therapy linked to improved gestational diabetes outcomes

Mediterranean diet-based nutrition therapy linked to improved gestational diabetes outcomes

Women with gestational diabetes assigned to medical nutrition therapy based on the Mediterranean diet for 3 months experienced an improvement in glycemic profile at delivery that was comparable to pregnant women with normal glucose tolerance, study data show.

Read the full story here: Healio (free registration)/Endocrine Today (10/19)

 

Miscarrying at Work: The Physical Toll of Pregnancy Discrimination

Miscarrying at Work: The Physical Toll of Pregnancy Discrimination

Women in strenuous jobs lost their pregnancies after employers denied their requests for

light duty, even ignoring doctors’ notes, an investigation by The New York Times has found.

Read the full story here: The New York Times (tiered subscription model) (10/21)

 

Early menopause may shorten life expectancy, increase diabetes risk

Early menopause may shorten life expectancy, increase diabetes risk

Early onset of menopause is associated with a shorter life span and longer duration of type 2 diabetes, according to findings published in Menopause.

“In women, [type 2 diabetes] often manifests during midlife and thus coincides with the timing of the menopausal transition,” Eralda Asllanaj, MD, MSc, DSc, of the department of epidemiology at Erasmus University Medical Center in the Netherlands, and colleagues wrote. “Emerging evidence shows an association between age at menopause and diabetes, with studies reporting almost a twofold increased risk of [type 2 diabetes] with early onset of menopause. Also, it is well-established that early onset of menopause is associated with early death. This could be important because, although mortality rates for women with non-[type 2 diabetes] have declined over time, mortality rates for women with [type 2 diabetes] may have actually increased.”

Read the full story here: Healio (free registration)/Endocrine Today (10/19)

 

Safety Concerns Over Baby Boxes

Promoting baby boxes on grounds of infant safety is not supported by available evidence, according to an expert in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).

In a letter to The BMJ , Prof Peter Blair from the University of Bristol, and colleagues, argue that more research is needed to assess the safety implications of the cardboard boxes.

Read the full story here: Medscape (free registration) (10/18)

 

Asthma Risk in Infants Predicted by Total Serum Bilirubin

Asthma Risk in Infants Predicted by Total Serum Bilirubin

Total serum bilirubin levels of 9 to 11.9 mg/dL, 12 to 14.9 mg/dL, and 15 to 17.9 mg/dL were associated with an increased risk for childhood asthma, according to a retrospective study published in Pediatrics.

Read the full story here: Pulmonology Advisor (10/19)

 

More U.S. Women Dying From Childbirth. How One State Bucks the Trend.

More U.S. Women Dying From Childbirth. How One State Bucks the Trend.

Over the past three decades, the world has seen a steady decline in the number of women dying from childbirth. There’s been a notable outlier: the United States.

Here the maternal mortality rate has been climbing, putting the United States in the unenviable company of Afghanistan, Lesotho and Swaziland as countries with rising rates.

But that trend has been reversed in dramatic fashion in one state: California. The state Department of Public Health calculates that between 2006 and 2013, California lowered its maternal mortality rate by 55 percent from 16.9 to 7.3 deaths for every 100,000 live births, which translates to saving about one life in every 10,000 live births. The California rate is in line with those in Western Europe. During that same period, according to federal data, the U.S. rate rose from 13.3 to 22.

Read the full story here: The Pew Charitable Trusts/Stateline (10/23)

 

U.S. Birth Rates Continue to Drop as Age of New Moms Rises

U.S. Birth Rates Continue to Drop as Age of New Moms Rises

American women are having fewer children, and they’re having them later in life, a new government report shows.

“Overall, we saw continuing decreasing trends in total fertility,” said report author Danielle Ely, a health statistician at the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), which is part of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Dr. Jennifer Wu, an obstetrician-gynecologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, said the trends reflect shifting cultural norms.

HealthDay News (10/17)

 

Low Risk for Bacterial Coinfections in Febrile Infants With Viral Infections

Low Risk for Bacterial Coinfections in Febrile Infants With Viral Infections

Infants ≤60 days old with fever and confirmed viral infection are at a substantially lower risk for serious bacterial infection compared to infants without a virus, according to new findings published in the Journal of Pediatrics.

Infectious Disease Advisor (10/22)

 

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THE ATTACHED RECENT NEWS ARTICLES ARE FOUND FROM AROUND THE WEB.  THEY DO NOT NECESSARILY REPRESENT THE VIEWS OF SHEIS.COM OR ANY OF ITS CONTRIBUTORS (OFTEN, WE COMPLETELY DISAGREE WITH THE ARTICLE).  THESE ARTICLES ARE SIMPLY SHARED TO FURTHER KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING OF WOMEN’S HEALTH ISSUES.  IT IS OUR HOPE THAT BY SHARING THEM WE WILL ENCOURAGE DISCUSSION AND DEBATE.  PLEASE FEEL FREE TO COMMENT ON ANY OF THEM IN THE COMMENT SECTION BELOW.

 

ALSO, NONE OF THE CONTENT OF THE ARTICLES SHOWN ABOVE ARE THE INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY OF SHEIS.COM; OUR TEAM SIMPLY AGGREGATES THE STORIES FROM AROUND THE INTERNET INTO ONE PLACE, MAKING FINDING THEM EASIER ON YOU.  ALL CONTENT SHOWN REMAINS THE PROPERTY OF THE ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTOR.

 

STAY STRONG,

JAELIN STICKELS, CNM, WHNP

PRESIDENT & FOUNDER – SHE IS ONLINE, LLC

 

About the Author

Jaelin Stickels

Jaelin married her high school sweetheart (Ted) in 1984 and is the proud mother of 3 grown children (2 boys & a girl). She has a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas, a Master’s Degree from Georgetown and holds several other professional certifications related to health and wellness; currently, she is working on her Doctorate degree. Jaelin works as a Midwife and Nurse Practitioner with her business partner Andie Wyrick at Holistic Heritage Homebirth in the Woodlands Texas.