Every week the SHEis.com team scours the internet looking for news articles and videos related to women’s health and midwife issues.  We aggregate all that research here, so it is all in one place for you.  We would love to hear from you on any of the content below.

SHE is in the News – Headlines for the Week of 10/8/18:

Featured Article(s)

Other Great Articles

 

Featured Article(s)

Healthcare Inequality Extends Beyond Food Deserts

Healthcare Inequality Extends Beyond Food Deserts

“Maternity deserts,” healthcare provider bias also need to be addressed, expert say

The U.S. is the “most dangerous developed country” in which to have and deliver a baby, according to a panelist at The Atlantic Festival.

Roughly 700 women die within a year of giving birth, which is double the maternal mortality rate of 25 years ago, said Stacy Stewart, president of the March of Dimes at the Tuesday “The Equity of Health” panel.

And black women are disproportionately more likely to die during or after childbirth than white women, with three to four times the risk of mortality, she noted..

Read the full story here: MedPage Today (free registration) (10/2)

Jaelin’s Comments: I can hear many of you now.  OMG, here she goes again!!!  But really come on people, is this acceptable in the richest country in the world?  Just let this factoid from this article sink in:

“Roughly 700 women die within a year of giving birth, which is double the maternal mortality rate of 25 years ago”

Really in the USA!! We can and must do better!!!

 

U of S-UBC study finds that low-income women and babies benefit from prenatal care led by a midwife

A new study by the University of Saskatchewan and the University of British Columbia suggests that low-income women and their babies benefit greatly from prenatal care by a midwife.

The study found that vulnerable women under care of a midwife were about two-and-a-half times more likely to attend prenatal appointments and that when they did receive prenatal care, they were less likely to go into labour early and their babies were born healthier.

“Across the board, in all outcomes, women were doing better in the care of midwives,” Daphne McRae, a post-doctoral research fellow at UBC and the study’s lead author, said in an interview with CBC Radio’s Saskatoon Morning.

 

Read the full story here: CBC News (Canada) (10/4)

Jaelin’s Comments: Ok, ok, I know I am biased here.  But anyone who has been paying any attention to the data coming out over the last decade will not be shocked by these results.  This is a big study with about 58,000 women over a seven-year period.  A few of my favorite lines from the article:

  • “Across the board, in all outcomes, women were doing better in the care of midwives”
  • it all comes down to “the amount of trust and the amount of emotional and social support that midwives are able to offer.”
  • “Midwifery care is a relationship-based model and there is a lot of contact made between practitioners and their patients.”
  • “Midwives are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week for their patients”

BOOM! Drop the Mic, Jaelin OUT!

Other Great Articles

Hypertensive Women May Stop Medication While Pregnant

Hypertensive Women May Stop Medication While Pregnant

Many women with chronic hypertension stop taking their antihypertensive medications when they become pregnant, new data show, although it’s not clear why and whether this is appropriate, the researchers say.

“Hypertension is a known risk factor for maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality,” Lu Chen, MD, PhD, Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, Seattle, told theheart.org | Medscape Cardiology.

Read the full story here: Medscape (free registration) (10/4)

 

Early blood tests during pregnancy could predict gestational diabetes

Early blood tests during pregnancy could predict gestational diabetes

A recent study looked at whether monitoring blood sugar levels could be used as an early predictor of gestational diabetes.

Gestational diabetes is a condition in which a woman without diabetes develops high blood sugar levels during pregnancy. The development of gestational diabetes can have long-term effects on the health of both the mother and baby. Mothers have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes and heart disease, while their babies have an increased risk for macrosomia, where a newborn is significantly larger than average and obesity.

Recent research has suggested that measuring HbA1C, a blood test which measures your average blood sugar levels for the previous two to three months may help identify women at risk. Currently, HbA1C is only used during the first prenatal visit to identify women with type 2 diabetes and is not used to screen for gestational diabetes.

Read the full story here: Medical News Bulletin (Canada) (10/4)

 

FDA approves use of HPV vaccine for adults 27 to 45

FDA approves use of HPV vaccine for adults 27 to 45

The US Food and Drug Administration on Friday approved the use of a human papillomavirus vaccine called Gardasil 9 for men and women between the ages of 27 and 45. The FDA previously approved the HPV vaccine for people age 9 to 26.

Read the full story here: CNN (10/6)

 

HPV Subtypes Strongly Linked to HIV Infection Uncovered

HPV Subtypes Strongly Linked to HIV Infection Uncovered

A team of scientists led by investigators at the University of California, Riverside (UCR) has identified the individual subtypes of HPV that are strongly linked to HIV infections. While it has been known that individuals infected with HIV have a higher HPV prevalence, the impact that distinct HPV subtypes have on HIV acquisition has been elusive. However, the UCR team and their collaborators have just published new data that concludes a person with any HPV type, more than one HPV type, or high-risk HPV is more likely to acquire HIV.

Read the full story here: Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News (10/5)

 

Weight Loss After Menopause, Lower Breast Cancer Risk

Weight Loss After Menopause, Lower Breast Cancer Risk

Postmenopausal women who experience a weight loss of ≥5% are at lower risk for invasive breast cancer compared with women whose weight remains stable, say researchers.

Analysis of data from the large, prospective Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) Observational Study shows that for postmenopausal women who experienced a weight loss of ≥5% over a 3-year period — whether intentional or not — the risk for breast cancer was 12% lower than that of women whose weight stayed the same.

Read the full story here: Medscape (free registration) (10/9)

 

Arthritis Tied to Higher Risk for Anxiety, Depression

Arthritis Tied to Higher Risk for Anxiety, Depression

More than one fifth (22%) of adults with arthritis have anxiety, and 12% report depression, a national survey shows. Overall, 10.3 million adults with arthritis reported symptoms of anxiety, depression, or both.

Symptoms of anxiety and depression were much more likely among younger adults, patients with chronic pain or other chronic comorbidities, and those who could not work or who had disabilities.

Read the full story here: Medscape (free registration) (10/5)

 

Polio-like paralysis may be on the rise among children again

Polio-like paralysis may be on the rise among children again

A puzzling condition that causes partial paralysis in children is back on the uptick in parts of the U.S., with six cases under investigation in Minnesota and 14 reported in Colorado, health officials said Monday.

The children have acute flaccid myelitis or AFM, a weakening of the nerves that resembles polio. It was first identified in 2014, when 120 children were diagnosed.

Read the full story here: Today/NBC News (10/8)

 

Federal grant to support prenatal, early childhood program

Federal grant to support prenatal, early childhood program

Kentucky officials say a new $7.5 million grant will support a statewide program aimed at decreasing the number of premature deliveries and low birth weight babies.

The state Cabinet for Health and Family Services say the federal grant will support the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program, often called Kentucky’s HANDS program.

Officials say the program is offered in all 120 Kentucky counties through local health departments. It serves high-risk populations by providing assistance to overburdened parents during the prenatal period until a child’s third birthday.

Read the full story here: Houston Chronicle (tiered subscription model)/The Associated Press (10/8)

 

Scientists link diabetes to increased risk of arthritis and osteoporosis

Scientists link diabetes to increased risk of arthritis and osteoporosis

A study that draws on data from more than 100,000 people finds a link between diabetes and an increased risk of osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis.

Read the full story here: Medical News Today (10/5)

 

Ondansetron in Pregnancy Not Linked to Most Birth Defects

Ondansetron in Pregnancy Not Linked to Most Birth Defects

Use of ondansetron for the treatment of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy does not appear to be associated with birth defects, according to research published in the August issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Read the full story here: Physician’s Briefing/HealthDay News (10/2)

 

Pregnancy Rates Rise Among Women with Multiple Sclerosis

Pregnancy Rates Rise Among Women with Multiple Sclerosis

Pregnancy rates rose among women with multiple sclerosis (MS) from 2006 to 2014, even while pregnancies among other women declined, a retrospective study of U.S. commercial health insurance claims found.

And in the year before pregnancy, disease-modifying treatment was less common than expected, reported Maria Houtchens, MD, of Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, and colleagues in Neurology.

Read the full story here: MedPage Today (free registration) (10/2)

 

Large proportion of late preterm infants and older admitted to the NICU

Large proportion of late preterm infants and older admitted to the NICU

Babies born at 34 weeks’ gestation or older accounted for 75% of admissions and 69% of hospitalized days in the NICU, but only 15% of such infants had high acuity, while 10% were discharged after three days or less, according to a study in Pediatrics. The findings should prompt more studies on NICU admission attributes for the development of appropriate NICU use guidelines, researchers said.

Read the full story here: 2 Minute Medicine (10/3)

 

Monetary support from federal government reduces infant mortality

Monetary support from federal government reduces infant mortality

Federal funding for state- and local-level assistance programs significantly reduced infant, neonatal and postneonatal mortality in all 50 states, according to research published in BMJ Open.

Michael McLaughlin, a doctoral student, and Mark R. Rank, PhD, the Herbert S. Hadley Professor of Social Welfare at the Brown School at Washington University, St. Louis, wrote that this funding supports programs like Medicaid, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children.

“The federal government allocates hundreds of billions of dollars annually to state and local governments to help fund programs intended to improve the well-being of the overall population and specifically the health and well-being of low-income infants and pregnant women,” the researchers wrote. “Improving the health of pregnant women is important because prematurity and low birth weight are among the strongest predictors of infant mortality, and lower socioeconomic status — particularly poverty — is strongly linked to these conditions.”

Read the full story here: Healio (free registration)/Infectious Diseases in Children (10/1)

 

Task force: More research needed on how drugs affect pregnancy

Task force: More research needed on how drugs affect pregnancy

A National Institutes of Health task force recommended additional research on the affects of drugs used by pregnant women and nursing moms.

The Task Force on Research Specific to Pregnant Women and Lactating Women submitted its final recommendations to U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex M. Azar II, the NIH announced Monday.

Read the full story here: United Press International (10/2)

 

Pregnancy Complications Tied to More Menopausal Hot Flashes

Pregnancy Complications Tied to More Menopausal Hot Flashes

Tough pregnancies might translate into tough times during menopause, new research suggests.

Women who developed complications during pregnancy — including dangerously high blood pressure (“preeclampsia”) and gestational diabetes — were more likely to experience more hot flashes during menopause, the researchers found.

“This study further underscores the importance of pregnancy complications such as gestational diabetes and preeclampsia for later health, particularly cardiovascular health at midlife,” said study author Dr. Rhoda Conant, from the University of Oklahoma’s Health Science Center..

 

Read the full story here: HealthDay News (10/3)

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STAY STRONG,

JAELIN STICKELS, CNM, WHNP

PRESIDENT & FOUNDER – SHE IS ONLINE, LLC

About the Author

Jaelin Stickels

Jaelin married her high school sweetheart (Ted) in 1984 and is the proud mother of 3 grown children (2 boys & a girl). She has a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas, a Master’s Degree from Georgetown and holds several other professional certifications related to health and wellness; currently, she is working on her Doctorate degree. Jaelin works as a Midwife and Nurse Practitioner with her business partner Andie Wyrick at Holistic Heritage Homebirth in the Woodlands Texas.