Every week the SHEis.com team scours the internet looking for news articles and videos related to women’s health issues.  We aggregate all that research here, so it is all in one place for you.  We would love to hear from you on any of the content below.

 

SHE is in the News – Headlines for the Week of 7/9/18:

 

A Pregnant Woman's Diet Could Affect Her Baby's Gut Bacteria, Study Suggest

A Pregnant Woman’s Diet Could Affect Her Baby’s Gut Bacteria, Study Suggest

Infants whose mothers ate more fruit during pregnancy had elevated levels of Clostridium and Streptococcus but lower levels of Bifidobacterium in their gut, while those whose mothers consumed more red and processed meats had higher levels of Bifidobacterium, researchers reported in the journal Microbiome. The findings also showed increased Streptococcus and Clostridium levels among those born by cesarean section whose mothers ate more dairy products during gestation, which may explain the higher risk of dairy allergies among those born by c-section.

Read the Full Story — Newsweek (7/5)

 

Low platelets linked to pregnancy complications

Low platelets linked to pregnancy complications

A study that characterized the occurrence and frequency of thrombocytopenia throughout the course of pregnancy found a significant decline in platelet counts during the course of pregnancy, and significant differences between pregnant and nonpregnant women. However, the study – published in the New England Journal of Medicine – also found that women with pregnancy-related complications were more likely to have platelet counts less than 150,000/mm3, even in the absence of known causes of thrombocytopenia.

Read the Full Story — Family Practice News (7/5)

 

At least 8 million IVF babies born in 40 years since historic first

At least 8 million IVF babies born in 40 years since historic first

The world’s first in-vitro fertilization baby was born in 1978 in the UK. Since then, 8 million babies have been born worldwide as a result of IVF and other advanced fertility treatments, an international committee estimates.

Read the Full Story — CNN (7/3)

 

Americans Are Having Fewer Babies. They Told Us Why.

Americans Are Having Fewer Babies. They Told Us Why.

Americans are having fewer babies. At first, researchers thought the declining fertility rate was because of the recession, but it kept falling even as the economy recovered. Now it has reached a record low for the second consecutive year.

Read the Full Story — The New York Times (tiered subscription model) (7/5)

 

Infertility, Not Fertility Drugs, Linked to Raised Risk of Ovarian Cancer

Infertility, Not Fertility Drugs, Linked to Raised Risk of Ovarian Cancer

Fertility drugs do not increase a woman’s risk of ovarian cancer, a new study suggests.

It did find that infertility itself is associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer.

Read the Full Story — HealthDay News (7/6)

 

Study results call into question upper age limit for cervical cancer screening

Study results call into question upper age limit for cervical cancer screening

The upper age limit for cervical cancer screening may need to be increased, according to researchers who presented preliminary findings at this year’s Society of Gynecologic Oncology Annual Meeting on Women’s Cancer.

Guidelines recommend women stop undergoing cervical cancer screening after age 65 years. However, anecdotal reports indicated a considerably higher number of older women than might be expected present with cervical cancer.

Read the Full Story — Healio (free registration) (7/3)

 

Opposition to Breast-Feeding Resolution by U.S. Stuns World Health Officials

Opposition to Breast-Feeding Resolution by U.S. Stuns World Health Officials

A resolution to encourage breast-feeding was expected to be approved quickly and easily by the hundreds of government delegates who gathered this spring in Geneva for the United Nations-affiliated World Health Assembly.

Based on decades of research, the resolution says that mother’s milk is healthiest for children and countries should strive to limit the inaccurate or misleading marketing of breast milk substitutes.

Then the United States delegation, embracing the interests of infant formula manufacturers, upended the deliberations.

Read the Full Story — The New York Times (tiered subscription model) (7/8)

 

More Nurse Practitioners Now Pursue Residency Programs To Hone Skills

More Nurse Practitioners Now Pursue Residency Programs To Hone Skills

The patient at the clinic was in his 40s and had lost both his legs to Type 1 diabetes. He had mental health and substance abuse problems and was taking large amounts of opioids to manage pain. He was assigned to Nichole Mitchell, who in 2014 was a newly minted nurse practitioner in her first week of a one-year postgraduate residency program at the Community Health Center clinic in Middletown, Conn.

In a regular clinical appointment, “I would have been given 20 minutes with him, and would have been without the support or knowledge of how to treat pain or Type 1 diabetes,” she said.

But her residency program gives the nurse practitioners extra time to assess patients, allowing her to come up with a plan for the man’s care, she said, with a doctor at her side to whom she could put all her questions.

Read the Full Story — The Washington Post (tiered subscription model)/Kaiser Health News (7/9)

 

Certified nurse midwives create the right birth for each woman

Certified nurse midwives create the right birth for each woman

When three midwives gather for a lunchtime break at St. Mary’s OB-GYN and Midwifery Clinic, the banter naturally turns to babies — more specifically, to how newborns enter this world.

The midwives share stories about the joys of recent births. They compare notes on the array of aids they offer mothers to make the deliveries as comfortable as possible — Jacuzzi tubs, exercise balls, aromatherapy, massage, music, nitrous oxide. The relaxed conversation underscores the midwife philosophy that childbirth is a natural process, not a pathological condition.

Normalization of the birth process is a tenet of the care midwives provide to women before, during and after childbirth. Certified Nurse Midwives, like these on staff at St. Mary’s, also are trained to provide primary and well-woman care for women throughout their lives.

Read the Full Story — The Daily Sentinel (Grand Junction, Colo.) (tiered subscription model) (7/3)

 

Fertility problems, reproductive technology tied to slightly more birth defects

Fertility problems, reproductive technology tied to slightly more birth defects

Women who struggle to get pregnant or use reproductive technologies like in vitro fertilization (IVF) may be more likely to have preemies and kids with birth defects than their peers who conceive without difficulty, a U.S. study suggests.

Read the Full Story — Reuters (7/3)

 

Early pregnancy iron deficiency may predict hypothyroxinemia in second, third trimester

Early pregnancy iron deficiency may predict hypothyroxinemia in second, third trimester

Pregnant women with iron deficiency in the first trimester are more likely to have lower levels of free thyroxine and an increased risk for hypothyroxinemia in the second or third trimester vs. those without iron deficiency in early pregnancy, according to findings from a retrospective study conducted in China.

Read the Full Story — Healio (free registration)/Endocrine Today (7/11)

 

Report Warns of Dog Illness That Can Spread to Owners

Report Warns of Dog Illness That Can Spread to Owners

A bacteria carried by dogs that haven’t been neutered can produce flu symptoms in humans and potentially jeopardize a pregnancy, a new study suggests..

Read the Full Story — HealthDay News (7/11)

 

Atlanta hospitals reveal limitations in preventing mother-to-child HIV transmission

Atlanta hospitals reveal limitations in preventing mother-to-child HIV transmission

Researchers have identified several limitations in preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV in major delivery units in the Atlanta metropolitan area, according to published study results in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society.

Read the Full Story — Healio (free registration)/Infectious Diseases in Children (7/11)

 

Pelvic Exam in ER Doesn't Help Predict STI for Young Females

Pelvic Exam in ER Doesn’t Help Predict STI for Young Females

Pelvic examination does not increase the sensitivity or specificity for diagnosis of chlamydia, gonorrhea, or trichomonas over taking a history alone for young female patients presenting to the emergency department with suspected cervicitis or pelvic inflammatory disease, according to a study published online July 2 in the Annals of Emergency Medicine..

Read the Full Story — Physician’s Briefing/HealthDay News (7/10)

 

American Cancer Society creates blueprint to reduce cancer mortality by 2035

American Cancer Society creates blueprint to reduce cancer mortality by 2035

Researchers from the American Cancer Society identified trends in disparities and outcomes for cancer over the last few decades in an effort to highlight the need for better quality care for all individuals with cancer, according to a report published in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians..

Read the Full Story — Healio (free registration)/HemOnc Today (7/10)

 

Multivitamin-mineral supplements do not reduce heart disease, deaths

Multivitamin-mineral supplements do not reduce heart disease, deaths

Taking multivitamins and minerals does not reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease or associated deaths, according to a new review of existing research.

“There is no scientific evidence that (these) supplements promote cardiovascular health,” lead author Dr. Joonseok Kim from University of Alabama at Birmingham told Reuters Health by email. “We hope that our paper helps to settle the debate” on the use of multivitamins and minerals (MVM) for cardiovascular disease prevention.

Read the Full Story — Reuters (7/10)

 

FDA Strengthens Warnings for Fluoroquinolone Antibiotics

FDA Strengthens Warnings for Fluoroquinolone Antibiotics

A safety labeling update was approved by the FDA for all fluoroquinolone antibiotics, as they may increase risk of mental health side effects and severe low blood sugar, including hypoglycemic coma. Current FDA-approved fluoroquinolones include Bayer’s Avelox and Cipro, Melinta Therapeutics’ Baxdela, Merus Labs’ Factive, Janssen’s Levaquin, and ofloxacin.

Read the Full Story — eMPR (7/10)

 

Many Pediatricians Skip Developmental Screening, Study Finds

Many Pediatricians Skip Developmental Screening, Study Finds

Fewer than one third of young children receive a recommended parent-completed developmental screening, and the rate of developmental surveillance during healthcare visits is “not substantially higher,” the authors of a cross-sectional analysis warn.

Read the Full Story — Medscape (free registration) (7/10)

 

'Babies given solid food sooner sleep better'

‘Babies given solid food sooner sleep better’

Babies given solid food plus breast milk from three months sleep better than those who are solely breastfed, according to a new study.

Official advice is to breastfeed exclusively for the first six months of life.

Read the Full Story — BBC (7/10),

 


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STAY STRONG,

JAELIN STICKELS, CNM, WHNP

PRESIDENT & FOUNDER – SHE IS ONLINE, LLC

 

About the author

Jaelin married her high school sweetheart (Ted) in 1984 and is the proud mother of 3 grown children (2 boys & a girl). She has a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas, a Master’s Degree from Georgetown and holds several other professional certifications related to health and wellness; currently, she is working on her Doctorate degree. Jaelin works as a Midwife and Nurse Practitioner at Nativiti Family Birth Center & Women's Health Associates in the Woodlands Texas.