Every week the SHEis.com team scours the internet looking for news articles and videos related to women’s health issues.  We aggregate all that research here, so it is all in one place for you.  We would love to hear from you on any of the content below.

SHE is in the News – Headlines for the Week of 8/27/18:

 

STD Rates Continue to Climb in U.S.

STD Rates Continue to Climb in U.S.

The United States is experiencing a “steep and sustained” spike in sexually transmitted diseases, a new government analysis shows.

Cases of gonorrhea, syphilis and chlamydia all increased in 2017, making it the fourth straight year in which STD infections continued to expand.

“The United States continues to have the highest STD rates in the industrialized world,” said David Harvey, executive director of the National Coalition of STD Directors. “We are in the midst of an absolute STD public health crisis in this country. It’s a crisis that has been in the making for years.”

Read the complete article @: HealthDay News (8/28)

 

Clinical report provides guidance on marijuana use in pregnancy and lactation

Clinical report provides guidance on marijuana use in pregnancy and lactation

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published a clinical report that examines the established and emerging data surrounding marijuana use in pregnancy and provided guidelines for clinicians based on current consensus.

Read the complete article @: 2 Minute Medicine (8/27)

 

Tight targets for gestational diabetes fail to improve birth weight, maternal outcomes

Tight targets for gestational diabetes fail to improve birth weight, maternal outcomes

Stricter treatment targets for gestational diabetes were associated with greater insulin use, but no difference in primary birth weight or maternal outcomes, according to findings from a comprehensive large-scale cohort study published in Diabetic Medicine.

Read the complete article @: Healio (free registration) (8/24)

 

Maternal quetiapine exposure may not contribute to malformations in infants

Maternal quetiapine exposure may not contribute to malformations in infants

Study results published in the American Journal of Psychiatry indicated that quetiapine exposure during first-trimester pregnancy was not strongly associated with major malformation in infants.

However, the authors cautioned that these results can only rule out an approximate fivefold increased risk for malformation due to the uncertainty over the exact risk estimate.

Read the complete article @: Healio (free registration)/Psychiatric Annals (8/22)

 

Testosterone Levels Increased in Third Trimester Pregnancy in PCOS

Testosterone Levels Increased in Third Trimester Pregnancy in PCOS

According to study results published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, pregnant women in their third trimester with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have higher total testosterone and free testosterone levels than women without PCOS.

Read the complete article @: Endocrinology Advisor (8/24)

 

Women Struggling to Get Pregnant Turn to Fertility Apps

Women Struggling to Get Pregnant Turn to Fertility Apps

When Nicole and Christopher Roberts of North Stonington, Conn., decided to start a family in 2016, Nicole quickly became pregnant, but then miscarried three months later.

Getting pregnant a second time became far tougher than they expected. Mrs. Roberts, 32, started taking neonatal vitamins, tracking her menstrual cycle carefully, taking over-the-counter ovulation tests, and even trying a few wacky internet suggestions, such as putting her legs up in the air after sex and not moving for half an hour.

Read the complete article @: The New York Times (tiered subscription model) (8/27)

 

More Teenagers Than Ever Are Getting the HPV Vaccine, CDC Says

More Teenagers Than Ever Are Getting the HPV Vaccine, CDC Says

More teenagers than ever before are getting vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV), according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Federal guidelines now say that all children should start two-dose HPV vaccination at age 11 or 12 to protect against HPV-associated cervical, vaginal, penile, anal and throat cancers. Despite that recommendation, however, HPV vaccination rates have traditionally lagged far below their targets. That’s still true — but the new report does suggest that rates are rising.

Read the complete article @: TIME online (8/23)

 

Why Russian trolls stoked US vaccine debates

Why Russian trolls stoked US vaccine debates

Russia’s meddling online went beyond the 2016 US presidential election and into public health, amplifying online debates about vaccines, according to a new study.

The recent research project was intended to study how social media and survey data can be used to better understand people’s decision-making process around vaccines. It ended up unmasking some unexpected key players in the vaccination debate: Russian trolls.

Read the complete article @: CNN (8/23)

 

Newborns’ Immune Systems Ramp Up After Birth

Newborns' Immune Systems Ramp Up After Birth

A baby’s immune system kicks into high gear immediately after birth, a new study finds.

Changes in a newborn’s immune system have been difficult to assess because doing so has relied on samples taken from the umbilical cord immediately after birth. In this study, researchers used a new immune cell analysis technique to follow 100 premature and full-term babies for their first few weeks of life.

Read the complete article @: HealthDay News (8/24)

 

Sen. Kamala Harris introduces bill to fight black maternal health disparities

Sen. Kamala Harris introduces bill to fight black maternal health disparities

Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) on Wednesday introduced the Maternal Care Access and Reducing Emergencies Act, described in a statement as an effort to “reduce the racial disparities in maternal mortality and morbidity.”

“This bill is a step towards ensuring that all women have access to culturally competent, holistic care and to address the implicit biases in our system,” Harris said.

Read the complete article @: Mic (8/23)

 

CDC – Top HPV-Associated Cancer Is Now Oropharyngeal

CDC - Top HPV-Associated Cancer Is Now Oropharyngeal

Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is now the most common HPV-associated cancer in the United States, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that covers the years 1999 to 2015.

During that period, cervical cancer dropped from being the top HPV-associated cancer and oropharyngeal SCC took its place.

Read the complete article @: Medscape (free registration) (8/23)

 

Experts find discrepancies between FDA, CDC vaccine recommendations

Experts find discrepancies between FDA, CDC vaccine recommendations

Although both the CDC and the FDA strive for optimal safety and efficacy when recommending how vaccines are to be used in the Unites States, the two agencies may consider different criteria to form their recommendations, according to research published in Pediatrics.

Read the complete article @: Healio (free registration)/Infectious Diseases in Children (8/23)

 

RA, JIA may raise risk of preterm delivery

RA, JIA may raise risk of preterm delivery

Women with RA and juvenile idiopathic arthritis have increased risk for preterm delivery, according to a study examining autoimmune disease in pregnancy. Corticosteroid use in any trimester increased that risk from 100%-400%, regardless of how active the arthritis was.

Read the complete article @: Family Practice News (8/27)

 

Depression in pregnancy may alter babies’ brains

Depression in pregnancy may alter babies' brains

Women with depression and anxiety during pregnancy may be more likely to have babies with altered brain development that might be linked to behavior problems later in childhood, a small study suggests.

Read the complete article @:  Reuters (8/27)

 

Longitudinal BMI growth curves for preterm infants internally validated

Longitudinal BMI growth curves for preterm infants internally validated

Body mass index (BMI) growth curves generated with longitudinal data for preterm infants demonstrated an initial decline in BMI driven by weight, followed by a linear increase in weight that was more pronounced in the lower gestational age (GA) groups.

Read the complete article @:  2 Minute Medicine (8/24)

 

Consumer baby monitors may get vital signs wrong

Consumer baby monitors may get vital signs wrong

Two popular monitors that promise to keep parents informed about their babies’ vital signs scored poorly in a test comparing them with actual hospital quality monitors, researchers say.

The commercially available monitors, which are not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, promise to sound an alarm via parents’ cell phones if the baby’s heart rate or blood oxygen levels move into danger zones, according to the study in JAMA.

Read the complete article @:  Reuters (8/21)

 

USPSTF – Prevent Perinatal Depression With Counseling

USPSTF - Prevent Perinatal Depression With Counseling

Healthcare providers should refer pregnant and postpartum women at increased risk for depression to counseling services, according to the U.S. Preventive Service Task Force (USPSTF).

In the draft recommendation statement posted to the USPSTF website, the group found “convincing evidence” (Level B) that referring these women to counseling services, including cognitive behavioral therapy and interpersonal therapy, will have a “moderate net benefit” in helping prevent perinatal depression among women who are at increased risk.

Read the complete article @:  MedPage Today (free registration) (8/28)

 

Hairy Baby? Better Get a C-section. Gingivitis? C-section. Scoliosis? C-section.

Hairy Baby? Better Get a C-section. Gingivitis? C-section. Scoliosis? C-section.

The challenges of trying to give birth naturally in surgery-happy Brazil.

It takes determination to have a normal childbirth in Brazil, and I’m not talking about just getting through labor.

My country has one of the highest rates of cesarean sections in the world: In 2015, they accounted for 55 percent of all births. (By comparison, that same year, the United States had a C-section rate of 32 percent, while in Sweden, they accounted for just 17.4 percent of births.) Sure, C-sections are necessary and lifesaving in certain situations, like cord prolapses or placental abruptions. But according to the World Health Organization, once C-section rates climb higher than 10 percent, there is no evidence that they help reduce maternal and newborn mortality; on the contrary, the surgery can lead to significant complications, which is why the W.H.O. recommends it only be undertaken when medically necessary.

Read the complete article @:  The New York Times (tiered subscription model) (8/27)

 

Household Interventions for Reducing Lead Successful

Household Interventions for Reducing Lead Successful

Reducing lead levels in the home may not affect neurobehavioral outcomes for children, according to a new study.

In the Health Outcomes and Measures of the Environment (HOME) Study, interventions aimed at reducing lead in the households of pregnant women were effective at reducing lead levels in various surfaces throughout the home and were sustained for 2 years, reported Joseph Braun, PhD, of Brown University in Providence, and colleagues.

Read the complete article @: MedPage Today (free registration) (8/27)

 

Less than one-third of reproductive-age women with rheumatic disease use prescription contraception

Less than one-third of reproductive-age women with rheumatic disease use prescription contraception

Just 32.1% of reproductive-age women with rheumatic diseases use any kind of prescription contraception, while at the same time more than 70% use at least one fetotoxic medication, according to findings published in Arthritis Care & Research.

Read the complete article @: Healio (free registration) (8/28)

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STAY STRONG,

JAELIN STICKELS, CNM, WHNP

PRESIDENT & FOUNDER – SHE IS ONLINE, LLC

About the Author

Jaelin Stickels

Jaelin married her high school sweetheart (Ted) in 1984 and is the proud mother of 3 grown children (2 boys & a girl). She has a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas, a Master’s Degree from Georgetown and holds several other professional certifications related to health and wellness; currently, she is working on her Doctorate degree. Jaelin works as a Midwife and Nurse Practitioner with her business partner Andie Wyrick at Holistic Heritage Homebirth in the Woodlands Texas.