Every week the SHEis.com team scours the internet looking for news articles and videos related to women’s health issues.  We aggregate all that research here, so it is all in one place for you.  We would love to hear from you on any of the content below.

SHE is in the News – Headlines for the Week of 8/6/18:

 

What Causes Morning Sickness?

What Causes Morning Sickness?

Recent research suggests morning sickness, including the severe form hyperemesis gravidarum, may be hereditary. Diet and lifestyle changes are recommended as first treatments for nausea and vomiting, but if they do not work there are several safe medication options for pregnant women.

The New York Times (tiered subscription model) (8/3)

 

Lower Fatty Acid Levels in Pregnancy May Up Early Preterm Birth Risk

Lower Fatty Acid Levels in Pregnancy May Up Early Preterm Birth Risk

A Danish study in EBioMedicine showed that women whose blood levels of the long-chain fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid plus docosahexaenoic acid during pregnancy were in the lowest quintile had a 10.27 odds ratio of early preterm birth, compared with those whose EPA and DHA blood concentrations were in the three highest quintiles. Researchers also found a 2.86 odds ratio of early premature delivery among those in the second-lowest quintile.

MedPage Today (free registration) (8/4)

 

Environmental toxins are seen as posing risks during pregnancy

Environmental toxins are seen as posing risks during pregnancy

A recent survey found most physicians did not routinely screen pregnant women for exposure to environmental toxins, although the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists earlier this year reaffirmed a committee opinion that called for identifying and reducing exposure to toxic agents. Dr. Nathaniel DeNicola of George Washington University said the toxic burden on pregnant women is clear and an immediate health concern.

The Washington Post (tiered subscription model) (8/4)

 

Single Threshold May Not Be Feasible for Gestational Diabetes

Single Threshold May Not Be Feasible for Gestational Diabetes

Using the World Health Organization’s 2013 gestational diabetes threshold of elevated fasting venous plasma glucose of at least 5.1 mmol/L was not suitable, according for an analysis of patient data from Denmark, because it “inappropriately labels as having GDM [gestational diabetes mellitus] an unmanageably large number of women who are at low absolute risk of pregnancy complications,” researchers reported in Diabetes Care. Australian researchers evaluated data for 1,516 women without GDM by Danish criteria and found that 40.1% were identified as having GDM by WHO standards, while there was no indication of elevated risk of cesarean delivery, excess fetal growth or hypertension during pregnancy at less than 5.6 mmol/L.

Physician’s Briefing/HealthDay News (8/2)

 

Childhood Abuse Linked to Endometriosis Risk

Childhood Abuse Linked to Endometriosis Risk

Women who experienced sexual or emotional abuse in childhood had a 20% to 50% higher likelihood of developing endometriosis in adulthood, compared with those who weren’t abused as children, according to a Swiss study in the journal Human Reproduction. A separate study in the same journal also showed a 10%, 15% and 31% increased endometriosis risk among those who were physically abused, those who were sexually abused and those both physically and sexually abused in childhood, respectively.

Medscape (free registration)/Reuters (8/2)

 

Lung Cancer Deaths in Women to Rise Globally by 2030

Lung Cancer Deaths in Women to Rise Globally by 2030

Countries around the world are projected to see a 43% increase in the age-standardized mortality rate for lung cancer among women by 2030, higher than that for breast cancer, which is expected to drop by 9%, according to a study in Cancer Research. The findings, based on data from the World Health Organization Mortality Database from 2008 to 2014 and projections from the United Nations Population Division from 2015 to 2030, showed the US and other high-income countries will see the highest rates for both breast and lung cancers.

Medscape (free registration) (8/3)

 

 

Do antibiotics during pregnancy affect the health of premature infants?

Do antibiotics during pregnancy affect the health of premature infants?

Preterm infants whose mothers took antibiotics during pregnancy had three times lower odds of developing necrotizing enterocolitis and death, and had an insignificantly higher late-onset sepsis risk, compared with those whose mothers didn’t receive antibiotics, researchers reported in the Journal of Pediatrics. The findings also showed a threefold increased death risk, but no higher odds of NEC or LOS, among those with elevated postnatal antibiotic exposure.

Medical News Bulletin (Canada) (8/4)

 

Obesity Could Set Stage for Heart Issues in Pregnancy

Obesity Could Set Stage for Heart Issues in Pregnancy

Pregnant women with a body mass index of 34 — considered obese — had higher blood pressure and thicker left ventricles than those with a BMI of 25.5, according to a small study presented at an American Heart Association meeting. Researchers studied 24 women who were in the first trimester of their pregnancy, and they said the cardiovascular changes they observed could lead to preeclampsia and other complications.

HealthDay News (8/1)

 

Study finds ‘baby-talk’ aids language development in infants

Study finds 'baby-talk' aids language development in infants

A Scottish study in the journal Cognitive Science showed that infants with higher exposure to baby-talk words, or short and repeated words, had improved language development between ages 9 months and 21 months. The findings suggest “that diminutives and reduplication, which are frequently found in baby-talk words — across many different languages — can facilitate the early stage of vocabulary development,” said lead researcher Mitsuhiko Ota.

BBC (8/1)

 

Folic Acid Supplements in Pregnancy Help Kids of Women With Epilepsy

Folic Acid Supplements in Pregnancy Help Kids of Women With Epilepsy

Norwegian researchers found that 17% of children whose mothers were treated for epilepsy and took folic acid supplements during pregnancy had language delays at age 18 months, compared with 34% of those whose mothers were treated but didn’t take folic acid and 11% of those whose mothers didn’t have epilepsy. “Half of the risk of having language delays at 18 months could be attributed to the lack of folic acid in children exposed to epilepsy drugs,” lead researcher Dr. Elisabeth Synnove Nilsen Husebye said.

HealthDay News (8/1)

 

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STAY STRONG,

JAELIN STICKELS, CNM, WHNP

PRESIDENT & FOUNDER – SHE IS ONLINE, LLC

About the Author

Jaelin Stickels

Jaelin married her high school sweetheart (Ted) in 1984 and is the proud mother of 3 grown children (2 boys & a girl). She has a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas, a Master’s Degree from Georgetown and holds several other professional certifications related to health and wellness; currently, she is working on her Doctorate degree. Jaelin works as a Midwife and Nurse Practitioner with her business partner Andie Wyrick at Holistic Heritage Homebirth in the Woodlands Texas.