Every week the SHEis.com team scours the internet looking for news articles and videos related to women’s health issues.  We aggregate all that research here, so it is all in one place for you.  We would love to hear from you on any of the content below.

SHE is in the News – Headlines for the Week of 9/10/18:

 

Severe delivery complications on the rise among U.S. pregnant women

Severe delivery complications on the rise among U.S. pregnant women

An increasing proportion of U.S. women are experiencing serious and potentially life-threatening complications while giving birth, government researchers report.

Between 2006 and 2015, rates of severe complications rose by 45 percent overall, according to a report released by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP).

Read the full story at: Reuters (9/5)

Jaelin’s Comments: While I agree with the fact that more women are experiencing serious and potentially life threatening complications while giving birth, I completely disagree with the authors reasoning why.  In my experience many (maybe even most..) of these complications are cause by a cascade of childbirth interventions pushed on women as standard practice by the medical establishment.  Midwives across the country who practice “The Midwifery Model of Care” (pretty much hands off and let your body do what it was built to do) are experiencing c-section rates around 5% versus nation wide hospital rates of 30% +.  Having worked in hospital L&D as a nurse and working with hospitals (on the rare occasion we have to transfer a patient) I can tell you both doctors and nurses are way to eager to jump in and “Help” things along.  What do you think, I would love to hear your thoughts in the comment section below?

 

USPSTF: All pregnant women should be screened for syphilis

USPSTF: All pregnant women should be screened for syphilis

A previous recommendation made by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, or USPSTF, suggesting that all pregnant women receive screening for syphilis early in pregnancy has been reaffirmed. This guidance was rated with a grade A.

The recommendation was made after a significant rise in congenital syphilis cases was reported in the U.S. According to the organization, rates declined between 2008 and 2012, but an 87% increase in the rate of cases occurred between 2012 and 2016.

Read the full story at: Healio (free registration)/Infectious Diseases in Children (9/4)

 

Pregnancy not contraindicated in non-cirrhotic portal hypertension

Pregnancy not contraindicated in non-cirrhotic portal hypertension

Despite a significant incidence of portal hypertension-related complications, overall pregnancy outcomes remained favorable in women with idiopathic non-cirrhotic portal hypertension, according to a study published in Journal of Hepatology.

“About 15% of patients with [idiopathic non-cirrhotic portal hypertension (INCPH)] are women of childbearing age, who can become pregnant. However, pregnancy and postpartum are prothrombotic states and pregnancy might exacerbate portal hypertension,” Pierre-Emmanuel Rautou, MD, PhD, from Hôpital Beaujon in France, and colleagues wrote. “Our main findings are that maternal outcome is good … and that fetal outcome is relatively favorable when pregnancy reaches 20 weeks of gestation.”

Read the full story at: Healio (free registration) (9/4)

 

Recent Increase in Contraception Use Noted Among U.S. Teenagers

Recent Increase in Contraception Use Noted Among U.S. Teenagers

Among U.S. adolescents, there were increases in contraceptive use from 2007 to 2014, including dual-method use and long-acting reversible contraception, according to a study published in the August issue of the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Laura D. Lindberg, Ph.D., from The Guttmacher Institute in New York City, and colleagues used national data on behaviors of female teenagers aged 15 to 19 years to estimate trends in pregnancy risk from 2007 to 2014.

Read the full story at: Physician’s Briefing/HealthDay News (9/5)

 

A quarter of adults are too inactive, putting health at risk

A quarter of adults are too inactive, putting health at risk

More than a quarter of the world’s adults – or 1.4 billion people – take too little exercise, putting them at higher risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, dementia and cancers, according to a World Health Organization-led study.

In 2016, around one in three women and one in four men worldwide were not reaching the recommended levels of physical activity to stay healthy – at least 150 minutes of moderate, or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise a week.

Read the full story at: Reuters (9/4)

 

Prenatal and postnatal homelessness linked with poorer health outcomes

Children <4 years of age with a history of prenatal or postnatal homelessness were more likely to have prior hospitalizations, fair or poor health status and developmental risk compared to children without any history of homelessness.

Read the full story at:  2 Minute Medicine (9/3)

 

FISH OIL DURING PREGNANCY LINKED TO BIGGER, HEALTHIER CHILDREN

FISH OIL DURING PREGNANCY LINKED TO BIGGER, HEALTHIER CHILDREN

Pregnant women who take fish oil supplements could boost their baby’s growth up until the age of six, according to a study.

Consuming supplements of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, a type of fish oil, was linked to children having both a higher lean mass and bone mass at the age of six in the study, published by the journal The BMJ.

Read the full story at: Newsweek (9/4)

 

Sitting for long hours at your desk? It can kill you

Sitting for long hours at your desk? It can kill you

Sitting for too long without taking a break may increase a wide range of health risks, even if one engages in recommended amounts of physical activity, scientists say.

Further studies are needed to determine “the most effective and practical interventions for reducing habitual sitting,” said Linda Eanes from the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley in the US.

Read the full story at: The Economic Times (9/3)

 

C-suite candidates: Hiring advice from a top executive recruiter

C-suite candidates: Hiring advice from a top executive recruiter

The gender equity problem is significant in health IT, with more than half of women in the industry saying that it will take 25 years or more to achieve gender parity, according to a recent Rock Health report.

It’s a pretty bleak outlook, but supported by some damning facts: Just a mere 10 percent of CEOS are women at digital health startups, with similar findings at digital health VC firms. And C-suite executives at the hospital level have been stagnant for three years, with just a third of all executives.

Read the full story at: Healthcare IT News (8/28)

 

Advanced practice providers have become an integral part of the oncology care team

Advanced practice providers have become an integral part of the oncology care team

Advanced practice providers have become an integral part of the oncology care team to help address the increasing number of patients and survivors, according to survey results.

The survey — conducted through joint efforts of ASCO, American Academy of PAs (AAPA), Association of Physician Assistants in Oncology, Advanced Practitioner Society for Hematology and Oncology, and Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) — identified at least 5,350 APPs in oncology, although researchers estimated the number may actually be as high as 7,000.

Read the full story at: Healio (free registration)/HemOnc Today (8/31)

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THE ATTACHED RECENT NEWS ARTICLES ARE FOUND FROM AROUND THE WEB.  THEY DO NOT NECESSARILY REPRESENT THE VIEWS OF SHEIS.COM OR ANY OF ITS CONTRIBUTORS (OFTEN, WE COMPLETELY DISAGREE WITH THE ARTICLE).  THESE ARTICLES ARE SIMPLY SHARED TO FURTHER KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING OF WOMEN’S HEALTH ISSUES.  IT IS OUR HOPE THAT BY SHARING THEM WE WILL ENCOURAGE DISCUSSION AND DEBATE.  PLEASE FEEL FREE TO COMMENT ON ANY OF THEM IN THE COMMENT SECTION BELOW.

 

STAY STRONG,

JAELIN STICKELS, CNM, WHNP

PRESIDENT & FOUNDER – SHE IS ONLINE, LLC

About the Author

Jaelin Stickels

Jaelin married her high school sweetheart (Ted) in 1984 and is the proud mother of 3 grown children (2 boys & a girl). She has a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas, a Master’s Degree from Georgetown and holds several other professional certifications related to health and wellness; currently, she is working on her Doctorate degree. Jaelin works as a Midwife and Nurse Practitioner with her business partner Andie Wyrick at Holistic Heritage Homebirth in the Woodlands Texas.