Every week the SHEis.com team scours the internet looking for news articles and videos related to women’s health issues.  We aggregate all that research here, so it is all in one place for you.  We would love to hear from you on any of the content below.

SHE is in the News – Headlines for the Week of 9/17/18:

How to solve D.C.’s maternal health crisis? A health advocacy group proposes some ideas

How to solve D.C.’s maternal health crisis? A health advocacy group proposes some ideas

What is clear is that D.C. has among the worst maternal mortality rates in the country. What is clear is that if you’re a black mother in D.C. you’re twice as likely to have a preterm birth than a white mother.

What is less clear is how to change these outcomes.

On Wednesday, medical providers, policy makers and community organizations gathered to tackle that goal at the district’s first-ever Maternal and Infant Health Summit at the Walter E. Washington Center.

Read the full story at: The Washington Post (tiered subscription model) (9/12)

Jaelin’s Comments: This is a really interesting article.  I really like that they seem to be focusing on a more holistic approach versus increase interventions.  I am going to be keeping my eyes on this.  What do you think, let me know in the comments below?

 

Mild Gestational Diabetes Ups Risk for Women and Their Children

Mild Gestational Diabetes Ups Risk for Women and Their Children

Women with gestational diabetes — which was diagnosed using broader “new” criteria — were five times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes and three times more likely to develop prediabetes in the decade after pregnancy than other pregnant women in a large global observational study.

Children whose mothers had had gestational diabetes were also more likely to be obese, have high body fat, a large waist circumference, and skinfolds at age 11 years. (However, for the combined coprimary outcome of overweight or obese, there was no significant difference between 11 year olds of mothers with versus without gestational diabetes).

Read the full story at: Medscape (free registration) (9/11)

 

Psoriatic Arthritis Stable for Most in Pregnancy

Psoriatic Arthritis Stable for Most in Pregnancy

The majority of women with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) were in remission or a state of low disease activity throughout pregnancy, although some experienced an amelioration of symptoms during pregnancy and then a worsening postpartum, Norwegian researchers found.

Approximately 75% of women were either in remission, defined as a Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28) below 2.6, or had low disease activity, which was a DAS28 between 2.6 and 3.2, before becoming pregnant, according to Kristin Ursin, MD, and colleagues from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim.

Read the full story at: MedPage Today (free registration) (9/11)

 

Birth weight affected by mother’s exposure to air pollution, new B.C. study says

Birth weight affected by mother’s exposure to air pollution, new B.C. study says

A new study showing fetal growth may be improved by the use of portable air purifiers inside the home reinforces the urgent need for countries to reduce airborne pollutants, according to a Simon Fraser University researcher.

Ryan Allen, associate professor with SFU’s faculty of health sciences and one of the study’s lead researchers, said that while this new research focused on how household air purifiers affect the health of pregnant women and the growth of their babies, the study’s conclusions demonstrate air pollution needs to be addressed at its source rather than in the home.

Read the full story at: The Toronto Star (9/11)

 

CDC urges public to get flu shot by end of October

CDC urges public to get flu shot by end of October

The CDC on Sept. 7 recommended all individuals six months and older receive a seasonal flu vaccine, ideally by the end of October.

People develop antibodies against the flu about two weeks after vaccination, so they should receive a flu shot before the virus starts spreading through their community, according to the agency.

Read the full story at: Becker’s Clinical Leadership & Infection Control (9/10)

Jaelin’s Comments: I know this is a controversial subject, but I am not a big fan of flu shots for everyone.  If you are in a high-risk group (the elderly) OK, but if you are a healthy individual, I would skip it.  But that is just my thoughts… What do you think, let me know in the comments below?

 

Vaginal candidiasis more likely with real-world use of SGLT2 inhibitors vs. clinical trials

Vaginal candidiasis more likely with real-world use of SGLT2 inhibitors vs. clinical trials

Women with type 2 diabetes who begin taking SGLT2 inhibitors are at higher risk for developing vaginal candidiasis and symptomatic vaginitis than clinical trials previously indicated, according to study results published in the Journal of Diabetes Investigation.

Read the full story at: Healio (free registration)/Endocrine Today (9/10)

 

Poor Sleep May Drive Obesity, Hypertension in Black Women

Poor Sleep May Drive Obesity, Hypertension in Black Women

Poor sleep may contribute to low levels of physical activity, high blood pressure, and obesity in middle-aged black women, suggesting that efforts to combat obesity and high blood pressure in this population should address sleep quality, researchers say.

Read the full story at: Medscape (free registration) (9/11)

 

USPSTF Reaffirms Ocular Prophylaxis for All Newborns

USPSTF Reaffirms Ocular Prophylaxis for All Newborns

All newborns should receive ocular prophylaxis to prevent gonococcal ophthalmia neonatorum, according to the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF).

There is “convincing” evidence that ocular prophylaxis with 0.5% erythromycin ophthalmic ointment can prevent gonococcal ophthalmia neonatorum. The net benefit is “substantial,” and the practice is recommended for all newborns (“A” recommendation), reported the USPSTF, in a draft recommendation statement on their website.

Read the full story at: MedPage Today (free registration) (9/11)

 

Pertussis Vax at Birth May Offer Benefits at Age 3 Months

A dose of acellular pertussis vaccine at birth was associated with significantly higher pertussis antibody titers by 10 weeks, regardless of the mother’s vaccination status, researchers found.

Read the full story at: MedPage Today (free registration) (9/10)

 

Perinatal Mortality Rates Remain Unchanged From 2014 to 2016

Perinatal Mortality Rates Remain Unchanged From 2014 to 2016

Rates of perinatal mortality remained unchanged from 2014 to 2016, according to an August data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics.

Elizabeth C.W. Gregory, M.P.H., from the National Center for Health Statistics in Hyattsville, Md., and colleagues used data from the National Vital Statistics System to assess trends in perinatal mortality. Perinatal mortality was defined as late fetal death at 28 weeks or more plus early neonatal death under age 7 days.

Read the full story at: Physician’s Briefing/HealthDay News (9/6)

 

Race predicts risks for cesarean delivery, ED use in gestational diabetes

Race predicts risks for cesarean delivery, ED use in gestational diabetes

Hispanic women with gestational diabetes are nearly three times more likely to deliver by cesarean section vs. Asian women with gestational diabetes, according to findings from a retrospective study published in The Diabetes Educator.

Read the full story at: Healio (free registration)/Endocrine Today (9/6)

 

Anxiety during pregnancy linked to adverse birth outcomes

Anxiety during pregnancy linked to adverse birth outcomes

Maternal antenatal anxiety was associated with increased risk for multiple negative perinatal outcomes, including preterm birth, lower mean birth weight and earlier gestational age, according to a study published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry.

Read the full story at: Healio (free registration)/Psychiatric Annals (9/7)

 

Diet and Exercise May Stem Weight Gain of Pregnancy, but Should Begin Early

Diet and Exercise May Stem Weight Gain of Pregnancy, but Should Begin Early

For years, maternal health experts have worried about a troubling statistic: More than half of all pregnant women in America are overweight or obese when they conceive, putting them and their children at a higher risk of developing diabetes and other health problems.

So about a decade ago, the federal government launched a multimillion-dollar trial to see whether diet and exercise could help overweight women maintain a healthy weight during their pregnancies and potentially reduce their rate of complications. On Thursday, the findings were announced, and the results were mixed: Starting a diet and exercise program around the beginning of their second trimesters helped many women avoid excess weight gain during their pregnancies. But it did not lower their rate of gestational diabetes, hypertension and other adverse outcomes.

Read the full story at: The New York Times (tiered subscription model) (9/6)

 

Why Do Female Troops Get Pregnant During Deployment?

Why Do Female Troops Get Pregnant During Deployment?

Active duty women in the U.S. military are more likely to have an unintended pregnancy than civilian women in the U.S. population, according to one military official and some researchers and advocates interviewed by MedPage Today.

Historically, servicewomen have had difficulty accessing birth control due to logistical as well as cultural barriers. In addition, abortions and abortion counseling are not provided by the Department of Defense (DOD) or the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA).

Read the full story at: MedPage Today (free registration) (9/6)

 

CDC: CV Event Prevention Stalls, Especially Among Middle-Aged Adults

CDC: CV Event Prevention Stalls, Especially Among Middle-Aged Adults

Over two million preventable cardiovascular event-related hospitalizations and about 400,000 deaths occurred in 2016, including about 73,000 preventable deaths in middle-age adults, researchers found.

There were 2.2 million preventable hospitalizations and 415,480 deaths in 2016, costing the healthcare system over $32 billion, reported Janet S. Wright, MD, of the CDC, and colleagues.

Read the full story at: MedPage Today (free registration) (9/6)

 

Exercise Doesn’t Affect Timing of Menopause, Study Finds

Exercise Doesn't Affect Timing of Menopause, Study Finds

New research seems to settle the question of whether there’s a link between how much a woman works out and her risk of early menopause.

The conclusion? There is no link.

Previous studies have produced conflicting results, with some suggesting that very active women may be at lower risk of menopause before the age of 45, while other research came to the opposite conclusion.

Read the full story at: HealthDay News (9/7)

 

Adequate sleep during infancy can help curb long-term obesity, new study finds

 

When it comes to obesity prevention, sleep is not usually what comes to one’s mind. However, a new research has revealed that sufficient sleep during infancy can help curb long-term obesity.

One in three children are overweight or obese by the time they start school. Treating obesity once established is challenging, however, researchers observed that sleep intervention in infancy reduces the risk of obesity for participants in the later stages of an infant’s life.

Read the full story at: Deccan Chronicle (9/7)

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STAY STRONG,

JAELIN STICKELS, CNM, WHNP

PRESIDENT & FOUNDER – SHE IS ONLINE, LLC

About the Author

Jaelin Stickels

Jaelin married her high school sweetheart (Ted) in 1984 and is the proud mother of 3 grown children (2 boys & a girl). She has a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas, a Master’s Degree from Georgetown and holds several other professional certifications related to health and wellness; currently, she is working on her Doctorate degree. Jaelin works as a Midwife and Nurse Practitioner with her business partner Andie Wyrick at Holistic Heritage Homebirth in the Woodlands Texas.