Every week the SHEis.com team scours the internet looking for news articles and videos related to women’s health issues.  We aggregate all that research here, so it is all in one place for you.  We would love to hear from you on any of the content below.

SHE is in the News – Headlines for the Week of 9/3/18:

 

Yes, cuddles can help ease babies’ pain from needle sticks

Yes, cuddles can help ease babies' pain from needle sticks

Babies have long been offered a bit of sugar water or breastmilk to comfort them during needle sticks, and a new study suggests these methods of pain relief may work even better when babies are also nestled in their mothers’ arms.

Read the full story at: Reuters (8/30)

 

Racial disparities in maternal health outcomes difficult to erase

Racial disparities in maternal health outcomes difficult to erase

When Lynette Granger had her first child four years ago, she described both her pregnancy and delivery as going smoothly.

“My first pregnancy was amazing, no complications, sickness or anything,” she said. When Granger, who resides in the West Side Chicago neighborhood of Humboldt Park, became pregnant with her second child last year however, complications developed almost immediately.

Read the full story at: Modern Healthcare (tiered subscription model) (9/1)

 

Pre-pregnancy counseling ‘crucial’ for women with CVD

Pre-pregnancy counseling ‘crucial’ for women with CVD

Fewer women with CVD die or develop HF during pregnancy compared with 10 years ago. However, maternal mortality in women with CVD is 100 times higher than expected, with the highest mortality in women with pulmonary arterial hypertension, according to new data from the ROPAC registry.

Read the full story at: Healio (free registration)/Cardiology Today (8/30)

 

Hyperemesis Gravidarum Doesn’t Usually Recur

Hyperemesis Gravidarum Doesn't Usually Recur

Three out of four women who suffer the severe form of morning sickness that afflicted the Duchess of Cambridge do not experience it in subsequent pregnancies, according to a Finnish study.

Researchers identified 1,836 woman who were diagnosed during their first pregnancy with hyperemesis gravidarum and who went on to have at least one more pregnancy.

Read the full story at: Medscape (free registration)/Reuters (8/31)

 

Preconception Levels of Fatty Acids Tied to Fecundability

Preconception Levels of Fatty Acids Tied to Fecundability

Preconception plasma levels of phospholipid fatty acids can be associated with enhanced or impaired fecundability, researchers report.

“We found it especially interesting that monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs), which have been shown to protect against cardiovascular disease, were also associated with improved fecundability,” said Dr. Sunni L. Mumford from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, in Bethesda, Maryland.

Read the full story at: Medscape (free registration)/Reuters (8/29)

 

Obamacare May Have Boosted Access to Birth Control

Obamacare May Have Boosted Access to Birth Control

Medicaid expansion through the Affordable Care Act, also called Obamacare, may close a big gap in women’s access to reproductive health care, a new study suggests.

In a survey of nearly 1,200 women of childbearing age enrolled in Michigan’s expansion of Medicaid for low-income adults, one in three said the expanded coverage improved her access to birth control and family planning services.

Read the full story at: HealthDay News (8/31)

 

FDA warns of serious genital infection linked to certain diabetes drugs

FDA warns of serious genital infection linked to certain diabetes drugs

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) said on Wednesday a serious genital infection has been reported in patients taking a certain class of diabetes drugs, with one death and 11 others hospitalized.

The warning pertains to a class of medicines called SGLT2 inhibitors, first approved in 2013 to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes.

Read the full story at: Reuters (8/29)

 

Researchers find link between exposure to toxic metals and heart disease

Researchers find link between exposure to toxic metals and heart disease

Exposure to environmental toxic metals such as arsenic, lead, copper, and mercury has become a major global health concern. The metals like arsenic, lead, copper and cadmium are linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and coronary heart disease.

Read the full story at: Deccan Chronicle (India)/Asian News International (8/30)

 

U.S. is denying passports to Americans along the border, throwing their citizenship into question

U.S. is denying passports to Americans along the border, throwing their citizenship into question

The government alleges that from the 1950s through the 1990s, some midwives and physicians along the Texas-Mexico border provided U.S. birth certificates to babies who were actually born in Mexico. In a series of federal court cases in the 1990s, several birth attendants admitted to providing fraudulent documents.

Based on those suspicions, the State Department during the George W. Bush and Barack Obama administrations denied passports to people who were delivered by midwives in Texas’s Rio Grande Valley. The use of midwives is a long-standing tradition in the region, in part because of the cost of hospital care.

Read ACNM’s statement about the issue.

Read the full story at: The Washington Post (tiered subscription model) (8/29)

 

Low Fasting Insulin Associated With Long-Term Dementia Risk

Low Fasting Insulin Associated With Long-Term Dementia Risk

Middle-aged women without diabetes and with low fasting serum insulin levels have an increased risk for dementia compared with women with medium insulin levels, according to a study published in Neurology.

Read the full story at: Neurology Advisor (8/31)

 

Guidelines recommend against routine testing for C. difficile in infants

Guidelines recommend against routine testing for C. difficile in infants

The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America has released new guidelines for detecting and preventing Clostridioides difficile — also known as Clostridium difficile — in a neonatal ICU setting.

Read the full story at: Healio (free registration)/Infectious Diseases in Children (8/31)

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THE ATTACHED RECENT NEWS ARTICLES ARE FOUND FROM AROUND THE WEB.  THEY DO NOT NECESSARILY REPRESENT THE VIEWS OF SHEIS.COM OR ANY OF ITS CONTRIBUTORS (OFTEN, WE COMPLETELY DISAGREE WITH THE ARTICLE).  THESE ARTICLES ARE SIMPLY SHARED TO FURTHER KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING OF WOMEN’S HEALTH ISSUES.  IT IS OUR HOPE THAT BY SHARING THEM WE WILL ENCOURAGE DISCUSSION AND DEBATE.  PLEASE FEEL FREE TO COMMENT ON ANY OF THEM IN THE COMMENT SECTION BELOW.

 

STAY STRONG,

JAELIN STICKELS, CNM, WHNP

PRESIDENT & FOUNDER – SHE IS ONLINE, LLC

About the Author

Jaelin Stickels

Jaelin married her high school sweetheart (Ted) in 1984 and is the proud mother of 3 grown children (2 boys & a girl). She has a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas, a Master’s Degree from Georgetown and holds several other professional certifications related to health and wellness; currently, she is working on her Doctorate degree. Jaelin works as a Midwife and Nurse Practitioner with her business partner Andie Wyrick at Holistic Heritage Homebirth in the Woodlands Texas.