Deaths From Adverse Events Down Slightly, Study Shows

Deaths From Adverse Events Down Slightly, Study Shows (medscape.com)

Mortality associated with adverse effects of medical treatment (AEMT) fell slightly in the United States from 1990 to 2016, according to findings published online January 18 in JAMA Network Open. However, the risk of death due to AEMT is not evenly distributed, with some age groups and geographic regions more affected than others.

A study published in 2016 found that medical error is the third leading cause of death in the United States, after heart disease and cancer. But the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes commonly recorded on death certificates may not provide sufficient information to reveal whether medical treatment or its aftermath contributed to a fatality.

Therefore, the authors of that report, Martin Makary, MD, and research fellow Michael Daniel, from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland, called for more granular reporting of events surrounding treatment-related death to better estimate the scale of the problem, which could facilitate strategies to reduce mortality.

In the new study, Jacob E. Sunshine, MD, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, and colleagues went beyond the information on death certificates to quantify causes stratified by age group, sex, and state of residence. The cohort study used 1990-2016 data on mortality in the United States due to AEMT from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors (GBD) tool. They also probed trends in types of harm and associations with other diseases and injuries, which they refer to as “cause-of-death chains.”……..

Read the Full Article at: Medscape

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